The Sims Team Up with Ironhack to Provide Tech Scholarships

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In honor of The Sims 4 Discover University, EA has partnered with Ironhack to provide a chance to win a scholarship at one of Ironhack’s tech campuses.

With The Sims 4 Discover University Expansion Pack, Sims can go to school to learn the in-demand skills needed for their future careers. And with The Sims and Ironhack scholarship, it’s your chance to do the same. We’re offering players the opportunity to extend their in-game experience to the real world. This scholarship encourages applicants to learn and discover some of the exciting careers within the video game and technology industries.

The scholarship application is open to anyone over 18, until Dec. 17. To apply for the scholarship you’ll need to take a technical test related to your course of choice: Web Development, UX/UI Design, or Data Analytics. The test is available until Jan. 5, 2020.

If the technical test was successful, you’ll be selected for a 10-15 minute personal interview. The interview can be conducted via video call or at a local Ironhack campus. Personal Interviews are available until Jan. 24, 2020. Winners will be notified the following week.

Both partial and full scholarships are available, and Ironhack offers 24-week part-time and nine-week full-time programs for each course.

Nine Ironhack campuses are available around the world, with the only US campus in Miami, FL. Ironhack does not offer remote or online courses, and does not offer visa support for international students.

 

 

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Discovering Sexual Identity Through Games: A Daughter’s Perspective

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I remember how important it was for me to be able to speak to my mom when I encountered something that frightened me or I didn’t know how to process. She would also do something that I plan to do when I have kids—she asked me to make an argument for why I thought the content in question would enrich me, even if the rating meant I should be a bit older. She was incredibly patient with 7-year-old me when I explained that Tomb Raider would help me learn about mythology, and she was patient when I asked for a game called Evil Zone because it was supposed to have such a good story. What was important for her was that I made a case for spending my money. Other people have different criteria. When I ran into content that confused or scared me: like the first time I accidentally read a romance novel at 11 or 12, she was more than willing to talk through the content with me. For that, I’m hugely grateful. Read More