kingdom hearts 3

Opinion: Kingdom Hearts 3 Has a Nostalgia Problem

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A YA-friendly, easy-to-play action-adventure that explores and celebrates Disney animated movies should be a winning formula. It certainly was in 2002 when the original Kingdom Hearts launched on the PlayStation 2. The popularity of the series and decade plus drought of a main-line game created a huge amount of anticipation for Kingdom Hearts 3.

Unfortunately, Kingdom Hearts 3 feels like a PS2 game in all the worst ways.

Seventeen years feels like forever ago, but I played and enjoyed the original Kingdom Hearts. The hack and slash combat was fast and fun, and the use of Disney and Final Fantasy characters as NPCs and party members was something truly special. The story rested on whimsical light against darkness tropes, which is perfectly fine when you’re battling alongside Goofy and Donald. When the sequel came out in 2005 I jumped all over it, only to be left with a vastly more convoluted story involving virtual world copies, soul-merging heroes, and impostor villains.

Several spin-off games, prequels, and side stories were released in the years between Kingdom Hearts 2 and 3, which I ignored. I fully expected to be completely lost in Kingdom Hearts 3’s story. But I did not expect the series’ defiant refusal to evolve beyond its PS2-era interface, combat, and level design.

kingdom hearts 3

Kingdom Hearts 3 is a grim reminder of how far gaming has come in the last decade and a half. I was frustrated from the very opening level in the Disney Hercules world of Thebes and Mt. Olympus. Every area is mostly a series of walled, linear hallways, with a few larger rooms for bigger combat sequences. A minimap in the upper right corner is mostly useless, and the game lacks a proper world map. Countless times I got completely turned around, doubling back for awhile before I realized I was going the wrong way.

Exploration in most worlds is extremely limited and not very rewarding. The exception early on is the Toy Story world, which primarily takes place inside a three story toy store, granting a bit of freedom to explore different areas. Even then I got completely lost when I was told to go to one location, only to finally look it up online where exactly I needed to go. Never have I ached for a proper quest marker or just any kind of journal. At the very least a standard map would’ve saved so much of my frustration, even with the mostly boring level designs.

Don’t even get me started on the Gummi ship sequences. They managed to make the weakest part of the original games and make it even worse in Kingdom Hearts 3.

To travel to each new world you have to pilot an ugly, blocky, customizable ship in a pseudo free-roaming space sequence. Controlling the Gummi ship is abysmally frustrating. Worse still the game forces you into retro shoot ’em up boss battles between worlds. These boss fights weren’t difficult but took forever to complete, all while doing nothing but mildly moving the ship around and holding down the attack button.

kingdom hearts 3

On-foot combat isn’t much better. Fighting the heartless and the nobodies mostly boils down to mashing the attack button as quickly as possible while Sora vaults through the air with colorful keyblade attacks. Occasionally a special attack is available, such as uniting with your allies or summoning a neon-colored Disney attraction, like the teacups or carousel.

The attraction attacks are a neat idea but given their resource-less cost you never pass them up, and it turns the already dull combat into an even duller shooting gallery or rhythm game. The first time you unleash the teacups or the splash run is a blast. Not so much the 20th time.

Gaining a new keyblade after completing a world is the one piece of fun loot you’ll ever get. Each keyblade has slightly different stats and different special attacks they can unleash, including transforming into entirely different weapons like a warhammer, dual pistols, or a magical staff. Visually it’s fun transforming the Frozen keyblade into a pair of lighting fast dual blades, but the actual combat doesn’t change. I’m still mostly mashing the attack button.

kingdom hearts 3

Elemental spells can be thrown around, but feel sluggish and weak compared to the much quicker basic attack combos, and selecting a spell using the d-pad is a nasty UI holdover from the PS2 era. Equipping abilities is also needlessly fiddly. Sora and friends level up and gain new abilities, which must be actively equipped. Each ability takes up a certain AP cost, and a character can only equip so many. If you equip an accessory which grants additional AP, you’ll need to first de-equip a number of abilities in order to shuffle your items around. It’s exactly as annoying as it sounds.

I’m not going to comment too much on the story itself, given that I fell out of the Kingdom Hearts loop long ago. But I was disappointed in how the story approaches the Disney worlds. The worlds of Frozen and Tangled simply recreate the movies, beat for beat, including drawing cutscenes directly from the films (yes, they do the entire “Let it Go” number).

In the Frozen world I was hoping to actually adventure with Queen Elsa. She has superhero-style ice powers – how do you not include her as a party member! But no, we have to tell the entire Frozen story again and follow everyone around, at one point getting thrown into an annoying, bland ice labyrinth for no reason other than to pad out the adventure.

kingdom hearts 3

The Pixar worlds fare much better. Both Toy Story and Monsters Inc take place AFTER their respective films (first films anyway). The stories and level designs are much better served when they’re not beholden to retelling stories that were clearly not built for video game adventuring. Tangled’s world consists of running through a forest to the castle, then running back through the exact same forest. Whereas in Toy Story Sora and company are shrunk down and explore a toy store with giant robots. The Pixar worlds are far more interesting (to a point) and make the actual Disney animated worlds that much more disappointing.

I had fond memories of the original Kingdom Hearts. And I still think a high-concept RPG using Disney’s deep roster of worlds and characters is a wonderful thing to explore in a video game. But Kingdom Hearts 3’s shocking refusal to evolve beyond its aging level designs and simplistic combat create an experience that only the most nostalgia-blinded fans can enjoy.

wicked to the core

Disney Villainous: Wicked to the Core Review

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Publisher: Ravensburger
Age: 10+
Players: 2-3
Game Length: 40-60 minutes
MSRP: $24.99

Disney Villainous (now referred to as Disney Villainous: The Worst Takes All) released last year as a devilishly clever card game where players take on the role of infamous Disney Villains, like Ursula and Maleficent. Its asymmetrical gameplay, intuitive action system, and classic Disney artwork made it one of our favorite tabletop games of last year.

This month Ravensburger released Disney Villainous: Wicked to the Core, a stand-alone expansion that adds three new Disney Villains: Hades, Dr. Facilier (Shadow Man), and the Evil Queen. The three can be played against each other for up to three players, or mixed in with the The Worst Takes All to add even more sinister machinations.

Mirror, Mirror

Each of the three new villains are given the same detailed treatment as the base game, with a folding player board for locations based on their movies, a deck of villain cards and hero cards, a molded player token, and some power tokens. Each villain is also given their own little paper guide to help explain how they achieve their unique player goals, whether it’s defeating Snow White or Ruling New Orleans. The components are just as fantastic as before, though all three villain tokens look a bit too similar to each other, each a slightly differently shaped and colored obelisk.

Hades is the most straight-forward of the bunch. As the god of the Underworld with his eyes set on Olympus, his goal is to move four of his unique Titan allies from one side of his board to the other. Titans have special powers but are quite expensive, and using them to defeat heroes will greatly slow down his progress – unless you can play a Hydra or Mortality Potion first. Hades’ Fate deck feels especially powerful and cruel, however, with strong heroes who trap or teleport Titans backwards.

wicked to the core

Dr. Facilier and the Evil Queen are much more complex than the heroes from The Worst Takes All. Dr. Facilier, better known as the Shadow Man from The Princess and the Frog, has a unique sidebar called the Fortune Deck. His goal is to control the Talisman, play The Cards Will Tell, and draw the Rule New Orleans card out of his Fortune Deck. It takes a lot of careful set up to pull off.

Meanwhile your opponent can use heroes to steal the talisman and stuff your Fortune Deck full of unwanted cards, to make drawing the one you need all the trickier. Being able to fan out the cards and let players draw the winner is a fun twist, and a wonderful translation of his tarot cards from the movie.

The Evil Queen from Snow White is one of the most classic Disney Villains of all time. In Wicked to the Core she functions a bit like Ursula in that she can’t directly attack heroes. Her prowess isn’t based on raw strength or power, but manipulation. Instead she needs to brew poison by converting poison tokens into power using a special unique action at her laboratory, while playing ingredient cards to unlock the dwarf’s cottage and summon Snow White herself.

The Evil Queen has to use poison along with the Take a Bite cards to defeat pesky heroes, such as the dwarfs who add to Snow White’s strength. It’s unfortunate that we didn’t get actual poison tokens; it’s up to the Evil Queen player to keep up with both identical but separate piles of tokens.

wicked to the core

The Rating

Disney Villainous: Wicked to the Core has a recommended age of 10+. Like The Worst Takes All, it’s aimed at an older crowd of animated Disney lovers, as it requires careful planning and hand management – and every villain plays differently. Dr. Facilier and Evil Queen are both more complex than any villain from the base game, making the expansion a better option for those who already know how to play, and are looking for more villains.

The Takeaway

Wicked to the Core benefits from the solid components and gameplay of Villainous, as well as the deep roster of fantastically themed villains from the Disney animated universe. All three villains play differently than the original six, and we appreciated that Wicked to the Core draws from multiple eras of Disney animation.  We recommend getting the base game first as these new villains are a bit more advanced, but no less enjoyable, and should make the villainous competition that much fiercer.

Find Disney Villainous: Wicked to the Core at Target.

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Disney, Nestle, Epic Games Pull YouTube Ads Over Child Exploitation Concerns

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Disney, Nestle, and Epic Games (makers of Fortnite) have temporarily suspended their ads on YouTube, following a recent video report by YouTuber Matt Watson.

In the 20-minute video, which has been viewed nearly 2 million times and sent to news outlets and other organizations, Watson details how easy it is to find a seemingly innocuous video with teens and children, whose comment sections are full of child predators who time stamp specific scenes, make suggestive comments, and even share child pornography with each other. Watson says: “YouTube’s recommended algorithm is facilitating pedophiles’ ability to connect with each other, trade contact info, and link to actual child pornography in the comments.”

Because the videos themselves aren’t explicitly pornographic, YouTube’s algorithm hasn’t flagged them. Yet predators continue to flourish. Worse still, YouTube’s recommended videos algorithm suggests similar child-starring videos, making it easier for these activities and communities to thrive.

Many of these videos are monetized, including pre-roll ads for things like Fortnite. In response, several companies, including Epic Games, have paused their ad funding, hoping to send a clear message to YouTube.

“We have paused all pre-roll advertising,” said a spokesperson from Epic. “Through our advertising agency, we have reached out to Google/YouTube to determine actions they’ll take to eliminate this type of content from their service.”

The Verge reported on Epic Games pulling their advertising, and received a statement from YouTube: “Any content — including comments — that endangers minors is abhorrent and we have clear policies prohibiting this on YouTube. We took immediate action by deleting accounts and channels, reporting illegal activity to authorities and disabling violative comments. There’s more to be done, and we continue to work to improve and catch abuse more quickly.”

Kingdom Hearts 3 Sells 5 Million Copies in its First Week

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Square Enix has announced that Kingdom Hearts 3 has already sold over five million copies since its January 29 release. This makes it the fastest-selling Kingdom Hearts game in history.

Square Enix is including physical and digital sales across both PlayStation 4 and Xbox One platforms. With its unique Disney collaboration, Kingdom Hearts 3 has long been one of the most highly anticipated games. It’s no surprise that Kingdom Hearts 3 is the fastest-selling game in the series. The last game in the main series, Kingdom Hearts 2, released in 2005, before console games were even sold digitally.

Kingdom Hearts 3 reunites keyblade wielder Sora with Donald and Goofy in a story of light vs darkness. They’ll journey through more Disney worlds, and for the first time, Pixar worlds. These include more recent Disney franchises such as Frozen, Tangled, Monsters Inc, Big Hero 6, Toy Story, and Pirates of the Caribbean.

Sora will learn new keyblade transformations and summonable companions based on these Disney travels. He’ll need these powers and allies to combat the constant threat of the Heartless.

The Kingdom Hearts series has sold 25 million units worldwide. The series celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2017. Kingdom Hearts has remained relevant thanks to numerous handheld spin-offs over the last decade.

The sales numbers are impressive, but pale in comparison to some of Square Enix’s prolific mega-franchises such as Tomb Raider (67 million), Dragon Quest (76 million) and Final Fantasy (142 million).