Nintendo Apps Now In Development Will Be Free to Download

Posted by | November 11, 2015 | Mobile, News | No Comments
Miitomo Nintendo

According to the Wall Street Journal, all of the Nintendo apps in development right now will be free to download, but will probably include in-app purchases. This came from DeNA CEO Isao Moriyasu at an investors meeting today. DeNA is working alongside Nintendo in the development of all mobile apps.

When Nintendo president Tatsumi Kimishima revealed Miitomo, Nintendo’s first app set for release in March 2016, he was asked what Nintendo and DeNA’s monetization plan was for their new mobile venture. “For the smart device applications that we will be releasing after Miitomo, we are considering monetization methods optimal for each application,” Kimishima said, “Including charging a fixed amount at point of purchase…We are planning to apply different revenue systems for each [app].”

Neither Kimishima nor Moriyasu has stated how many apps are actively in development right now, though we do know that they are planning on releasing five apps by March 2017.

The first of these will be a social app called Miitomo, in which your Mii asks you questions about your personality and then goes and chats with other player-associated Miis. These chats are limited to people on your friends list. Miitomo will tie in with Nintendo’s upcoming programs, My Nintendo and Nintendo Accounts.

Tomorrow, Nintendo will be broadcasting their first Nintendo Direct since E3. Nintendo Directs have been used for most of Nintendo’s major announcements over the last four years. While Nintendo has announced that there will be no news about any mobile titles or the upcoming NX console, but there are sure to be some other goodies in there. Be sure to stay tuned.

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.