Let's Play Monday: Splatoon Single-Player Mode, Part 4

Posted by | August 10, 2015 | Opinion | No Comments

This week, in a slightly shorter-than-usual Let’s Play, Simone and Courtney take on the second half of the third area in Splatoon‘s single-player mode. Simone’s in control of the GamePad again, fighting off Octolings and an Octostriker! Spooky.

Splatoon is Nintendo’s newest original concept. In the single-player story mode, squid kids (called Inklings) are pitted against the evil Octarians. The Octarians have stolen the Inklings’ Zapfish, which provides electricity to the Inkling capital Inkopolis.

Courtney, back from a week off of work, is feeling a bit shouty. She and Simone reveal that Courtney actually never speaks except for when she’s on camera. The two also discuss the origin of Judd the Cat, who moderates Turf Wars in multiplayer mode. Is Judd immortal? Is he the latest in a long line of judge cats? Is his name Judd because “Judd” sounds like “Judge”? Courtney also points out that the two news anchors Callie and Marie have names that sound like “calamari.” Well punned, Splatoon.

The Octostriker is very nerve-wracking. Much shouting is had. Simone has to be careful not to turn into a squid while she’s walking across grate floors because she’ll fall right through! She, er, messes that one up a couple of times.

After the Octostriker, we’ve got a boss battle to contend with. Simone dukes it out with a giant robot clam while Courtney cheers her on. It takes them a little longer to figure out how to beat this boss than usual, and Courtney gives Simone some bad advice, but (spoilers) they get there eventually.

Courtney and Simone do Let’s Plays almost every week! If you want to watch more of them, be sure to check out Pixelkin’s YouTube page, or click on any of the links below:

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.