Year Walk is Coming to Wii U

Posted by | July 16, 2015 | News | No Comments

Year Walk, the beautiful horror game by Swedish company Simogo, is coming to the Wii U!

Year Walk is a gorgeous point-and-click puzzle game about going on a traditional Scandinavian vision quest. The main character, Daniel, is in love with a woman who is engaged to marry another man. Feeling desperate, Daniel goes on a journey to see his own future, and on the way encounters terrifying creatures from Swedish folklore.

The game is pretty spooky, but I absolutely loved it (and I really don’t like horror games). I think it’s a great option for teens who are looking to get a little edgier with their games, but who aren’t quite ready for an M rating. Year Walk is rated T for Teen.

The new version of the game will incorporate the GamePad’s motion sensors and will also be able to display the world’s map and encyclopedia at all times. Even better, the GamePad will have a sketchpad that you can use to take notes as you work through the puzzles. Simogo, the company behind the game, has also revealed that this new version of Year Walk will include several new secrets. Given the number of differences between the mobile version and the desktop version of the game, I definitely believe them.

Simogo has a great tradition of knowing their platform really well. Their mobile games The Sailor’s Dream and Device 6 both use the small screen and touch features to excellent effect. All of their games (including Year Walk) tend to be incredibly self-aware. Considering the fact that the Wii U’s second screen often goes underused and unappreciated, I am really excited to see what they do with it.

Click here to read Simogo’s official announcement, or click here to watch a slightly less creepy version of the game trailer.

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.