Zelda: Twilight Princess May Be Coming to Wii U

Posted by | October 14, 2015 | News | No Comments
Twilight Princess

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess is one of the most popular Zelda games to date, and it now looks like it’s going to get the Wind Waker treatment (AKA an HD re-release for Wii U).

Are you excited? Because I’m pretty freaking excited.

Nothing has been officially announced, but diehard Nintendo fan Octogirl was digging through the backend of the Nintendo eShop (like you do) and came across a suspicious icon for Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. After investigating further, she found that the icon is neither a random placeholder nor a standard Virtual Console port. The icon was labeled “The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD,” and that title is still listed in the Nintendo servers. FISHY???

Obviously this is not a lot to go on, so I will check myself before I wreck myself.

Nintendo is no stranger to the nostalgia card—in fact you might say it’s their primary play. Rereleases of Zelda games come around every couple of years, it seems. Most recently, Majora’s Mask 3D came out for the 3DS, to rave reviews.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess originally came out in 2006 for the GameCube and Wii, simultaneously. It tells the story of Midna, erstwhile queen of the Twilight Realm, who is on a mission to reclaim her throne and oust her evil usurper, Gant. Oh, and Link is there, too. It’s one of the only Zelda games to ever receive the T for Teen rating, on account of its generally creepy demeanor.

Because the Wii U is backwards compatible with Wii games, you can actually already play the game on your modern console. But I definitely have my fingers crossed for an HD version. The real question—which version of the game will they recreate: left-handed Link, or right-handed? (Lefty Link forever!!!!)

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.