Animal Crossing: amiibo Festival and Happy Home Designer

Posted by | June 16, 2015 | News | 5 Comments
Animal Crossing Happy Home Designer Amiibo Festival

Today at Nintendo’s E3 press conference, we learned of a brand-new upcoming Animal Crossing game for Wii U, as well as more information about a previously announced Animal Crossing game on the 3DS.

Animal Crossing: amiibo Festival for Wii U

This brand-new Animal Crossing title looks like it’s taken a few tips from Nintendo’s Mario Party series. Animal Crossing characters travel around game boards and earn bells (money), have makeovers, visit friends, and more.

It looks like these activities are not particularly involved. Think The Game of Life, but instead of having babies and going to college, you hang out with friends and catch bugs. Still, it looks like a cute, simplified version of the party board games we know Nintendo is so good at creating.

Four new Animal Crossing amiibos are being announced for this game: Isabelle, Tom Nook, KK Slider, and Mabel. It’s unclear yet exactly what their function will be in the game, but given the title (amiibo Festival), I suspect you’ll need at least one.

Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer for 3DS

In this game, you play as an employee of Tom Nook, a local business owner familiar to longtime fans of the Animal Crossing franchise. Your job is to go to the homes of villagers and help them to redecorate. The villagers tell you what kind of look and feel they’re hoping to achieve, and then when you’re done they tell you how well you did.

This new gameplay twist is a great idea because it keeps the charm of the original games without making players feel as if they’re paying money for the same thing again and again. It’s slated for release on September 25 of this year.

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.