monster hunter: world

Monster Hunter: World Tips and Guide for New Players

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Monster Hunter: World may be the most accessible game in the series (read our review) but it’s still a tricky game to jump into, particularly if you’re completely new to the Monster Hunter series. We’ve compiled some helpful tips and explained some important mechanics to help start novice hunters on the right path to hunting and slaying.

No Level, All Gear

In Monster Hunter: World your progression is tied directly to your gear, as well as a single Hunter Rank number. This number could be considered your level, just without all the normal RPG benefits of stat increases and abilities. Your HR determines how difficult of a mission you can accept, as well as unlocking new areas, quests, and facilities in Astera. Every quest has an HR requirement, and you can never join one that’s above your HR. Keep that in mind when playing multiplayer.

Playing through Assigned Quests, or main story missions, will naturally raise your HR level.

Since your power comes directly from your gear, forging new weapons and armor is not only paramount to your success, it’s the primary method of essentially leveling up. See below for more tips on weapons and armor, but in general you should be stopping by the Workshop frequently and gathering what you need to forge the best equipment available to you.

monster hunter: world

The Easiest Starter Weapons

You begin with the basic iron version of all 14 weapon types, which is both very handy and incredibly overwhelming. Stick with the Sword and Shield at first for a solid baseline into standard melee combat, including both blocking and dodging.

From there you can experiment with the Great Sword and Hammer for slower but weightier attacks, the Dual Blades if you want to zip around quickly, or the Bow if you want to attack from range. There’s no wrong answer and much of your personal enjoyment will come from finding that right weapon set that works for you.

The weapons I would gently discourage completely new players away from initially are the very slow Lance and Gunlance, the Bowguns for micromanaging tons of different ammo, the Hunting Horn for its musical mini-game, and the Insect Glaive for adding a whole new dimension of buffs, kinsect customization, and aerial attacks.

Before heading out to the field with a new weapon, go to your room on the first floor and speak to your housecat Palico to transport to the Training Area. Here you can easily switch your equipment to test out new weapons. Basic combos will also be helpfully displayed right on the screen, similar to the training modes of fighting games. Experiment and discover what you enjoy.

Gather Your Party

Monster Hunter: World automatically populates online sessions, but you’ll need to select Join Quest from a quest board (or your handler) to actually join a multiplayer hunt – or Post a Quest and hope someone joins.

SOS flares are a useful way to find a greater search of online matches, provided the person in the hunt has fired a flare seeking help. You can do the same thing during any quest or Expedition after the first Great Jagras hunt in the main story.

monster hunter: world

If you’re wanting to play consistently with friends, the best method is to set up a Squad. Squads are Monster Hunter’s version of guilds. Create a Squad, then use the Invite a Friend option from the Start menu to invite them into your session, then invite them to your squad. From then on whenever you play in Squad Sessions, you’ll be playing a private server with your friends, and can easily join each other’s quests.

Expeditions, Investigations, and You

There are several different kinds of quests and missions in Monster Hunter: World. Most involve hunting a specific monster or group of monsters within set parameters, such as a limited number of faints and a varying time limit.

There are four options when you go to the quest board, and a fifth option for free roaming. We’ve explained them below.

Assigned Quests: These are the main story missions. You’ll need to complete them to progress your Hunter Rank. Since they feature cutscenes they are a hassle to play in multiplayer, since no one can join a mission if one player still has cutscenes to watch. A reminder should pop up once you can use an SOS flare, which is a sign that others can join.

Optional Quests: These are organized by Hunter Rank (represented by stars). You’ll unlock more as you complete the Assigned Quests. Optional Quests include standard hunts and captures, as well as gathering missions that can unlock new Canteen ingredients. You can also unlock Optional Quests by talking to people with the familiar yellow exclamation (!) above their heads in Astera.

Investigations: You can register Investigations at the Resource Center. Investigations are unlocked by battling, hunting, and tracking monsters. They’re designed to repeat multiple times and provide bonus rewards in addition to whatever you carve and find during the hunt. They’re also perfect for multiplayer outings, and soon you’ll be drowning in dozens of options. Pay close attention to the parameters; some allow only a single faint or a breezy 15 minute window, though increased challenges come with better rewards.

Events: Event Quests are unique quests provided by Capcom for a limited time. They often involve battling monsters within the arena, and can come with their own unique rewards.

Expeditions: Expeditions isn’t an option in the quest board. Instead you simply open up your map while in town, go to the World Map view, and select an area to explore. This lets you hunt in a zone without any set goals or time limits. It’s useful for gathering materials without worrying about the clock, though you can certainly hunt monsters as well. There’s also a few NPCs scattered around the zones you can talk to who offer special Bounties to complete. Remember to turn them in at the Resource Center.

Bounty Hunter

With the Resource Center (Tradeyard, near the entrance) you can Manage Investigations (see above) and Register Bounties. Bounties are like errands that you’re always working toward, no matter if you’re on a main quest or free roaming in an Expedition. You can register up to six bounties at any time, and they range from completing quests to hunting certain monsters to gathering certain types of materials.

Remember to check the Resource Center between quests for rewards and always have the max number of bounties registered. Bounties are a great way to earn Armor Spheres for upgrading your armor (see below).

Wear the Best Gear

You’ll be unlocking new armor sets at a rapid clip in the early game, as each new monster adds new armor pieces. The most important stat to look for is just boring old defense. You won’t need to worry about Elemental Resistances until a bit later in the game, when monsters start spewing poison or breathing fire.

monster hunter: world

Every piece of armor can be upgraded using Armor Spheres. These items are given as rewards for completing Investigations and Bounties. Go to the Workshop and Select Upgrade, and use the Armor Spheres to boost the defense stat of your various armor pieces. Each piece can only be boosted a set number of times, providing a natural ceiling for the set. This is motivation to keep crafting better armor!

Keep Your Blade Sharp

Eleven of the 14 weapons are melee weapons, and they need to be periodically sharpened. Weapon sharpness is represented by a small bar below your stamina in the upper left corner. As you strike a foe your weapon dulls, and the bar drops from green to yellow to red. You’ll do less damage and begin to see your weapon bounce off the monster’s hide with an insulting CLANG.

You need to use your Whetstone item (which is always equipped, like the fishing rod) and spend a few seconds sharpening. Since this leaves you completely vulnerable, it’s best to do it when the monster is retreating to a new area, or when it’s tied up with your Palico or other hunters.

Note that weapons are not created equal when it comes to their sharpness gauge. Typically Metal weapons will stay sharp longer (more green bar) than Bone weapons.

Affinity = Crit Chance

There’s a lot of things that aren’t well explained in Monster Hunter: World, and Affinity is one of them. You’ll find Affinity as a percentage stat on every weapon. It’s your chance to critically hit, doing increased damage. If it’s negative it means there’s a chance you could do reduced damage. A 20% positive Affinity means one in five hits should do increased damage.

Don’t neglect the Affinity percentage, and make sure to factor it when comparing weapons. Faster weapons, like the Dual Blades, greatly benefit from a high Affinity rating as you’ll be landing that boosted damage more often. Slower weapons like Hammers may prefer higher raw damage coupled with a negative Affinity, finding the trade-off more than acceptable.

Research Points

Research Points are earned when gathering materials, examining monster tracks, breaking body parts, and slaying and capturing monsters. Basically everything you do in the wild nets research points. They’re added to a currency-like pool you can use to forge Palico equipment as well as purchase meals at the Canteen.

Each monster also has its own Research Level, which you can view at the Ecological Research (the giant stack of books at the Tradeyard entrance, near the Resource Center). You have to actually visit the Ecological Research to apply any earned points, so make stopping there part of your routine in town. The points will unlock new information about monsters in your Hunter’s Notes (see below) as well as make tracking them via Scoutflies much easier. At level 3 the monster will show up on your minimap when you’re tracking it!

monster hunter: world

Know Thy Enemy

A good hunter gathers as much information about their prey as they can. On the pause menu you can access your Hunter’s Notes and look up detailed information of all the monsters you’ve encountered.

You’ll unlock additional information the more you hunt a monster, including its specific weak points (usually the head and tail) as well as any elemental and status weaknesses and resistances. If you’re hunting a specific monster it can be useful (and eventually, critical) to bring along the right weapon, though you needn’t really worry about it too much in the beginning. The most important information is knowing which body parts of the monster to target for extra damage.

Never Hunt on an Empty Stomach

Eating meals is usually not an important part of an action game, but it’s incredibly helpful in Monster Hunter: World.

In your home base of Astera you’ll find the Canteen on the third floor, manned (catted?) by a team of Palico cooks. You can pay either with money or research points, and you should have plenty of both.

Meals can boost your health, stamina, and provide useful buffs. It’s even more critical to eat when playing solo or with one other hunter, as your Palico receives several buffs as well (which in turn have a chance of buffing you).

monster hunter: world

Certain Optional Quests can unlock new ingredients at the Canteen, which you can use to customize your meals to create the perfect combination of stat boosts and buffs.

The effects of a meal last until you complete a quest, or until you faint. You can always eat a meal at campsites out in the world as well, just head over to the little oven near the tent.

Obey Your Thirst

Potions and Mega-Potions will be your primary means of health recovery. Gather Herbs and Honey and keep well-stocked at all times. Eventually you’ll unlock the Palico Vigorwasp Spray for a quick heal, and the Health Booster item for healing over time.

Later you can craft Mega-Nutrients to add to your max health, Energy Drinks to boost your stamina (and stave off Sleep effects), and Armorskin to boost your defense. Check the ingredients you need by opening your Crafting Menu from the Start Menu and when checking your Item Box next to the quest boards in Astera, or at any campsite. You can set items to auto-craft whenever you have the ingredients.

Note that like the meals, any potion effects you have will disappear if you faint.


It’s easiest with the aerial-fighting Insect Glaive but every hunter can attempt to land on the back of a monster to mount it. Use the terrain and items like the Glider Mantle to land on a monster’s back.

If you manage to mount a monster you will enter into a quick-time mini-game as you repeatedly slash at it with your carving knife while it attempts to throw you off. If you stay on you’ll eventually pull out your weapon and deal a massive blow. It’s a challenging, but rewarding maneuver to master in any battle.


monster hunter: world

Monster Hunter: World Review

Posted by | PlayStation 4, Reviews, Xbox One | No Comments

Available On: PlayStation 4, Xbox One (Coming later to PC)

I had the Anjanath on the run. Monster Hunter’s version of a Tyrannosaurus Rex decided he’d had enough of my hacking and slashing, and fled to higher ground. I chased after him, winding up the trees and branches in the Ancient Forest. We reached a nest-like clearing and faced each other, prepared to duel it out again. A terrifying roar signaled a newcomer to the party. We’d wandered into the nesting grounds of a dragon, the Rathian.

The 10-year old within me excitedly cheers as the giant monsters battle each other, the dragon picking up the T-Rex and dropping it from its nest. When the Rathian turns its attention toward me, I make like the Anjanath and run like hell.

Monster Hunter: World excels at capturing these emergent, exhilarating moments, and creating reactive areas where your hunter exists among larger, even deadlier hunters.
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Kingdom Hearts III

Pixelkin’s 30 Most Anticipated Games of 2018

Posted by | Feature, PC, PlayStation 4, Switch, Xbox One | No Comments

We’ve seen lots of exciting new game announcements throughout 2017, with the inevitable disappointment when we saw ‘2018’ as the date. The new year will bring us our first full year with the Nintendo Switch, including several new game entries for Kirby, Yoshi, and even Metroid.

Several big console games have been in development for years and made last year’s most anticipated list, including Red Dead Redemption 2, God of War, Spider-Man, and Detroit: Become Human. There’s all new games like Anthem and Sea of Thieves and remasters of classics in Shadow of the Colossus and Secret of Mana. And is this the year we’ll finally see the incredibly long awaited sequel that is Kingdom Hearts III?

Here are our 30 most anticipated games of 2018!


For Younger Kids:



Platforms: PlayStation 4
Date: 2018

What is Dreams? It’s by Media Molecule, the fine folks who developed the LittleBigPlanet series. Dreams looks to build on that user-generated concept, providing even more creative freedom through multiple styles, genres, and gameplay conventions.

Kingdom Hearts III

Platforms: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: 2018

Kingdom Hearts fans have been waiting for an official third entry for over a decade. This year should finally see the release of Kingdom Hearts 3, which will again feature the unique and beloved mashup between Square Enix and Disney.

Kirby Star Allies

Platforms: Nintendo Switch
Date: 2018

A new Kirby game was announced for the Nintendo Switch during E3, later titled Kirby Star Allies. The 2D platformer will feature four player co-op, and each character will possess Kirby’s signature power-copying abilities.

Ni no Kuni 2: Revenant Kingdom

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4
Date: March 23, 2018

Beloved anime film company Studio Ghibli isn’t directly involved with sequel Ni no Kuni 2: Revenant Kingdom, but it still possess that same beautiful art style and story-telling that make this JRPG series so memorable.

Sea of Thieves

Platforms: PC, Xbox One
Date: March 20, 2018

One of the few Xbox One exclusives (and Win 10 PC) coming in 2018, Sea of Thieves features cooperative and competitive multiplayer within a colorful, goofy world of pirate ships and buried treasure.

Secret of Mana HD

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4
Date: February 15, 2018

Secret of Mana was recently featured as one of the games included on the SNES Classic Edition, and the classic RPG still holds up well today. The HD remaster will feature all new 3D graphics and some modernized improvements to gameplay.

Spelunky 2

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4
Date: 2018

Spelunky 2 was a surprise announcement at the Sony’s conference at the Paris Games Week. All we know about it is from this trailer, which doesn’t show any gameplay but hints that we’ll be playing as the protagonist’s daughter this time around.

Starlink: Battle for Atlas

Platforms: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Date: Fall 2018

The toys-to-life genre did not have a good year in 2017, and the future looks bleak. One of the few new games on the horizon is Ubisoft’s Starlink: Battle for Atlas. Starlink features buildable, modular starship figures that attach directly to the controller.

Yoshi for Nintendo Switch

Platforms: Nintendo Switch
Date: 2018

A new untitled Yoshi game coming to Switch was announced at Nintendo’s E3 conference. It looks similar to Yoshi’s Woolly World, but features more of a paper/cardboard aesthetic, letting you manipulate the world. It will also include two player co-op.



For Older Kids and Teens:



Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: Fall 2018

With cooperative sci-fi action, Anthem looks a lot like EA’s answer to Destiny 2. It’s actually being developed by RPG veterans BioWare. Hopefully it’ll end up better than Mass Effect: Andromeda.


Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Date: Early 2018

Fe is a 3D adventure-platformer, and the first product of EA Originals, EA’s collaboration with indie developers. Fe emphasis exploration, discovery, and puzzle-solving within a striking forest world of shadows and contrasting colors.

Jurassic World Evolution

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: Summer 2018

The correct answer to the question, “What is the best Jurassic Park game?” is 2003’s Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis. Jurassic World Evolution, developed by the makers of Planet Coaster, looks to provide more great dinosaur theme park sim action.

Lost Sphear

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch
Date: January 23, 2018

Tokyo RPG Factory’s followup to 2016’s I Am Setsuna is Lost Sphear, which features more solid retro-inspired Japanese RPG goodness.

Marvel’s Spider-Man

Platforms: PlayStation 4
Date: 2018

Insomniac has been working on this big-budget Spider-Man game for awhile. Instead of being tied to any of the films, it will feature an open world design in New York City with an older, more experienced Peter Parker.

Metroid Prime 4

Platforms: Nintendo Switch
Date: 2018?

We saw only the slightest of logo teases at the tail end of Nintendo’s E3 press conference for Metroid Prime 4. There’s little chance we’ll actually see it in 2018, but any news about more Metroid is good news.

Monster Hunter: World

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: January 26, 2018 (PC version not yet dated)

With a big home console release and four player online co-op, Monster Hunter: World is posed to be the first game in the series to transcend the obtuse and challenging gameplay and welcome a wider audience.


Project Octopath Traveler

Platforms: Nintendo Switch
Date: 2018

Weird tentative title aside, Project Octopath Traveler features a gorgeous “HD-2D” style and gameplay inspired from classic 16-bit RPGs. It’s created by the same team at Square Enix who made the Bravely Default series.

Shadow of the Colossus

Platforms: PlayStation 4
Date: February 6, 2018

One of the biggest cult-classics from the PS2 era is finally getting an HD remake for PlayStation 4 next year. All the visual assets have been rebuilt for Shadow of the Colossus, but it will retain the same monster-scaling gameplay and poignant story.

Skull & Bones

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: Fall 2018

If Sea of Thieves looks a bit too cartoony and goofy, Skull & Bones may suit your pirate needs. We don’t know much more than the initial E3 announcement, but it will feature multiplayer co-op, and utilize the widely loved naval combat from Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag.

Surviving Mars

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: 2018

Paradox Interactive is making some of the best strategy sim games of the modern era. Surviving Mars will be upon the success of Cities: Skylines while adding the challenge of colonizing the red planet.


For Mature Teens and Parents:


A Way Out

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: March 23, 2018

A Way Out is a much more mature offering from the developer of Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons. It features a purely cooperative experience as two players control a pair of convicts who need to work together to break out of prison.

Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Date: 2018

Castlevania auteur Koji Igarashi made headlines by raising over $5 million on Kickstarter for this new 2D Castlevania-like. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night looks utterly fantastic, and will hopefully cement Igarashi as the rightful master of the “Iga-vania” genre.

Days Gone

Platforms: PlayStation 4
Date: 2018

Sony has been showing Days Gone, an open-world zombie game, for years, and it looks more impressive each time. We should be able to explore the post-apocalyptic Pacific Northwest sometime this year.

Detroit: Become Human

Platforms: PlayStation 4
Date: 2018

Detroit: Become Human‘s advanced facial features and animations make for harrowing trailers as players navigate complex dramatic moments involving androids in a near-future world.

Far Cry 5

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: March 27, 2018

The Far Cry series typically drops players into remote, exotic, war-torn locations around the world (or in the past or future). Far Cry 5 sends players into the uncomfortable evils reflected deep in the rural American heartland. I’m sure it will be completely free of controversy.

God of War

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: 2018

The eighth God of War game will drop the numbering scheme and add a new sidekick for Kratos, his own son Atreus. Added RPG elements make for a fairly big departure for the action series, as well as the new focus on Norse mythology and monsters rather than Greek.

Metro Exodus

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: 2018

The third game in the survival horror Metro series, Metro Exodus, looks far more expansive, letting you explore more of the surface world of a post-apocalyptic Russia gripped by nuclear winter.

Red Dead Redemption 2

Platforms: PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: Spring 2018

Rockstar Games doesn’t release a new game very often, but when they do, it’s a gigantic event. The very long-awaited sequel to 2010’s open world western, Red Dead Redemption 2 was initially teased with a 2017 release date. We still don’t know much about it other than it’s a prequel and will undoubtedly be hugely successful.

State of Decay 2

Platforms: PC, Xbox One
Date: 2018

Everyone asked for one feature after playing State of Decay: what about multiplayer? Undead Labs have listened, and State of Decay 2 will combine the excellent sim-action zombie game with cooperative multiplayer.

We Happy Few

Platforms: PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Date: April 13, 2018

We Happy Few is a BioShock-like immersive sim, set within a drug-addled British city in the 60s. As one of several playable characters, you’ll need to blend in with the citizens of the bombed-out city, who wear creepy masks and take a hallucinogenic drug called Joy.

monster hunter: world

Second Monster Hunter: World PS4 Beta Runs This Weekend

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In case you missed the first Monster Hunter: World beta, or don’t have PlayStation Plus, you can jump into the second beta, which takes place this weekend. Beta #2 starts Friday, December 22 9 am Pacific/12 pm Eastern on PlayStation 4. It ends December 26. Monster Hunter: World releases on January 26, 2018 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, and later on PC.

Content wise this beta features the exact same three hunts of scaling difficulty: Great Jagras, Barroth, and Anjanath, and the two zones of Ancient Forest and Wildspire Waste. It includes a few preset characters and palicos as well as the training area and a sampling of all 14 weapon types. The beta features both single player and up to four player multiplayer.

The second beta is opening up to a much wider audience beyond just those with PlayStation Plus. Like the first beta, it’s designed to test the server loads in anticipation of the game’s release next month. It’s not clear if you still need PS Plus to play multiplayer, however.

If you still have Monster Hunter: World installed, no additional download will be necessary. Otherwise you can begin pre-loading the beta today for when the beta starts on Friday.

Like the first beta, participating nets you some rewards if you play the full game on the same account. Completing any of the quests will earn one unique Face Paint customization. Completing each quest will net a small trove of useful items such as potions and traps, for use in the full game.

The Monster Hunter: World beta runs from December 22-26. Monster Hunter: World launches January 26, 2018.