Animal Crossing

Animal Crossing: New Horizons Seasonal Spring Updates Through June

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We can all agree that Animal Crossing: New Horizons‘ first seasonal event, Bunny Day, was too much. It lasted too long and resulted in an avalanche of eggs, making it hard to craft anything that wasn’t a Bunny Day recipe. Hopefully the next several events, which Nintendo has recently outlined, will fare much better.

The next event, beginning today, is Nature Day. Nature Day is a week-long event with special Nook Miles challenges that feature goals that have to do with nature, such as planting trees and watering flowers. Nature Day runs through May 4th.

Starting May 1 is the May Day Tour event. Between May 1 – 7, players can go to the airport and use a May Day Ticket to travel to a unique island that features a familiar visitor. Be prepared, the May Day Ticket is one-time use only.

After that is International Museum Day, which runs from May 18 – 31. This event will feature a Stamp Rally, where players can view their collected fish, insects, and fossils in the museum, and receive stamps in their stamp card and earn rewards.

Finally in June it’s Wedding Season. Wedding Season will run the entire month of June, and involve Harvey’s island. Visiting Harvey’s island during this event will allow players to take anniversary photos of married couple Reese and Cyrus. Players can earn wedding-themed items as a result.

Two new non-seasonal character events are also being added today (April 23). The first is Leif, a nature-lover who can visit your island with his traveling Garden Shop. Leif sells shrubs, flower seeds, and other foliage.

The second is Jolly Redd, an art dealer whose Treasure Trawler boat can visit the island to sell art and furniture. However, players will need to figure out which are genuine and which are fake. Genuine art can be donated to the museum in the new art gallery.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is available on Nintendo Switch. It’s rated E for Everyone.

Opinion: Animal Crossing: New Horizons Local Co-op is Frustratingly Limited

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I was the first person to play Animal Crossing: New Horizons in my house. I didn’t realize the power that would be bestowed upon me as the island’s primary resident representative. Now that my spouse and kid are enjoying the game – and playing more than me – we’ve discovered New Horizons’ frustrating limits on local co-op, holding back an otherwise endlessly endearing family game.

The first and biggest limitation is that every local player using the same Switch must share an island. Each player can use their own Nintendo accounts and set up their own homes. But they end up on the same island that the original player, the resident rep, chose at the beginning.

To play local co-op, each player will need to start the game on their account, set up their starter tent, and unlock the Call Resident app. From there, a player can use Call Resident in the Nook Phone menu to add a local player to the session. The player who started first will be the Leader. Only the Leader can talk to islanders, craft objects, and access their inventory. Players can switch leaders by going back to the Call Resident screen, or by shaking their Joy Con.

Sharing an island automatically creates several problems that online players with rowdy friends may have discovered – other players chopping down trees, destroying rocks, and otherwise harvesting all of your resources and altering the island.

Any player can use a Nook Miles ticket to travel to other islands, possibly meeting new potential islanders for their own island. If you’re sharing your island with others, it’s easy to end up with new island residents that you’ve never even met before (thankfully my kid picked an awesome pink frog with great musical tastes). These issues can be solved with communication and some household ground rules, but resources can become annoyingly scarce with everyone competing.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons`

To make matters worse, only the resident rep can turn in quests and supplies to Tom Nook (or Isabelle), and receive the rewards in DIY Recipes and tools, as well as advance the story’s main events. The other players will have to purchase the recipes and tools they need after they’re unlocked.

This is particularly annoying during an early game quest that involves furnishing three new houses with indoor and outdoor objects. Not only is the resident rep given the only DIY recipes to make the dozen or so needed objects, but the other players can’t even see which objects are needed for each house – they’re simply told to ask their resident rep, as if they’re not real players themselves.

Thus my spouse was left harvesting wood and stone and mailing them to me, so I could craft the tables, chairs, and clotheslines needed for the houses, a needlessly annoying workaround.

Yet when it comes to the museum, my kid quickly donated the 15 initial bugs, fossils, and fish and unlocked the full museum before I barely had a chance to chat with Blathers. The museum keeps track of which player donated which item, which is admittedly a neat feature, but the rules of who can do what are oddly inconsistent.

animal crossing: New horizons

Simultaneous co-op is even more strictly regulated, to the point where we hardly ever bother with it. One player is designated as the Leader. The Leader is the only player who has full access to their own inventory. The camera is tied to the Leader, teleporting any other players if they stray too far.

Non-leaders can still access whatever tools they have on them by cycling through with a button press (another minor annoyance). They can still chop trees and fish, but everything they pick up will be transferred to a shared stash instead of their own inventory. Since you kind of need access to your inventory and crafting tables to do much of anything in Animal Crossing, playing simultaneous co-op is next to useless compared to just taking turns. Thankfully you can swap between Leaders without restarting the co-op session, though this too can quickly become tedious.

It’s a huge shame that we weren’t given full split-screen co-op for New Horizons, but the Switch’s handheld mode makes split-screen prohibitive. With a a never-ending stream of fun tasks, charming atmosphere, and engrossing customization, Animal Crossing: New Horizons has all the makings of the perfect family game. It’s a shame local co-op was treated as an afterthought.

bunny day

Animal Crossing: New Horizon’s First Seasonal Event, Bunny Day, Starts Today

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The seasonal Bunny Day celebration begins today in Animal Crossing: New Horizons. Even though it’s called “Bunny Day,” the event itself runs through the next 10 days, ending April 12. Make sure to download the launch day 1.1 patch if you haven’t already to access the event.

A new character will be hiding somewhere on your island, an excited bunny named Zipper. Zipper will explain that painted eggs have been hidden around the island, including in trees, rocks, water (use the fishing pole!) as well as found in floating presents.

You’ll only be able to find a limited number of eggs each day. You can also travel to other islands by purchasing a Nook Miles Ticket, and find eggs on each island.

Eggs are used to craft the unique Bunny Day recipes, including furniture, accessories, and clothes, all with a pastel style. Bunny Day DIY Recipes are also found hidden around the islands. The closer it gets to Bunny Day (April 12) the more recipes Zipper will hide.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is available on Nintendo Switch. It’s rated E for Everyone. The Bunny Day event runs from April 1 to April 12.

My 8 Year Old’s Review of Animal Crossing: New Horizons

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Available On: Switch

After designing our characters we’re flown to a tropical island, armed with little more than a tent and some basic tools. We’re already in dept to benevolent landlord Tom Nook, but thankfully everything we do, from catching bugs and fishing to chopping wood and crafting furniture, earns Nook Miles that can be redeemed to upgrade our tent into a house and unlock bigger storage, better tools, and more juicy upgrades to transform our island into a personal paradise.

For our Animal Crossing: New Horizons review, I decided to try something a bit different. The sim life game is particularly kid-friendly, and my daughter happens to be at the perfect age to fall in love with it. After a week, she’s played more than I have. I sat down with her and we talked about what she liked, and didn’t like, about the game.

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Set Sail for Animal Crossing: New Horizons, Out Now on Switch

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One of the most anticipated games of the year has finally arrived. Animal Crossing: New Horizons is available now on Switch via physical stores and digital download on the Nintendo eShop, for $59.99.

In New Horizons you’ll customize your character and travel to a deserted island. The island won’t be deserted for long as you harvest resources, build tools, and craft buildings and furniture. All this work will attract new island residents who want to join with your friendly community.

“In Animal Crossing: New Horizons, you can transport yourself to a virtual island paradise,” said Nick Chavez, Nintendo of America’s Senior VP. “With relaxing gameplay you can enjoy by yourself or with friends and family, the game is a breath of fresh island air.”

Nintendo will supply free updates throughout the year, starting today. The first update adds the seasonal holiday Bunny Day in April. Nintendo Switch Online subscribers can also use NookLink to scan custom QR code patterns from New Leaf and Happy Home Designer using their smartphones, and download them to New Horizons.

New Horizons supports online and local multiplayer, though you’re limited to one island per Switch system. Up to four players can play locally on the same system and game cartridge, or up to eight with additional systems and games.

Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp mobile players can link their accounts to receive special items in New Horizons, and 50 Leaf Tickets for Pocket Camp.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons is available now on Switch. It’s rated E for Everyone.