App Camp for Girls Hits Indiegogo

Posted by | June 11, 2015 | News | No Comments
App Camp for Girls

App Camp for Girls is a summer camp program designed to teach middle school-aged girls how to design and code their own mobile apps. The program was launched in 2013 with help form an Indiegogo campaign. From now until July 1, they’re back on the crowdfunding platform in hopes of earning more money to improve the quality and scope of their camp.

App Camp for Girls initially launched in Portland, OR, but expanded last year to include Seattle. This coming summer, they’re expanding to Vancouver, Canada.

If you haven’t heard, there’s a bit of a gender gap when it comes to the tech community. According to a report by the American Association of University Women, “in 2013 just 12 percent of engineers and 26 percent of computing professionals were women.” According to App Camp for Girls, that percentage is even lower in the field of mobile app development. By encouraging young women to get engaged with this technology from a young age, we are planting the seeds for a healthier, more diverse future.

App Camp 4 Girls

Interested to see what the campers get up to? You can download some of their homemade apps a single bundle from the iTunes store for $0.99. Or you can fill out the application form and see what your own daughter learns this summer!

If you’re interested in contributing to App Camp for Girls’s campaign, check out their Indiegogo page here.

Girls Make Games, another crowdfunded tech summer camp for girls, is also on Indiegogo. This time they’re looking to collect money for a scholarship fund. Pixelkin had the chance to interview three campers from Girls Make Games a few months ago at PAX East. Their campaign ends in less than a week. Neither Indiegogo campaigns have yet reached their goal.

Courtney Holmes

About Courtney Holmes

Courtney is Pixelkin's Associate Managing Editor. While working with the Girl Scouts of Northern California, she mentored young girls in teamwork, leadership, personal responsibility, and safety. Today, she spends her time studying adolescent development and using literary analysis techniques to examine video games.