The Sims Team Up with Ironhack to Provide Tech Scholarships

Posted by | News, PC | No Comments

In honor of The Sims 4 Discover University, EA has partnered with Ironhack to provide a chance to win a scholarship at one of Ironhack’s tech campuses.

With The Sims 4 Discover University Expansion Pack, Sims can go to school to learn the in-demand skills needed for their future careers. And with The Sims and Ironhack scholarship, it’s your chance to do the same. We’re offering players the opportunity to extend their in-game experience to the real world. This scholarship encourages applicants to learn and discover some of the exciting careers within the video game and technology industries.

The scholarship application is open to anyone over 18, until Dec. 17. To apply for the scholarship you’ll need to take a technical test related to your course of choice: Web Development, UX/UI Design, or Data Analytics. The test is available until Jan. 5, 2020.

If the technical test was successful, you’ll be selected for a 10-15 minute personal interview. The interview can be conducted via video call or at a local Ironhack campus. Personal Interviews are available until Jan. 24, 2020. Winners will be notified the following week.

Both partial and full scholarships are available, and Ironhack offers 24-week part-time and nine-week full-time programs for each course.

Nine Ironhack campuses are available around the world, with the only US campus in Miami, FL. Ironhack does not offer remote or online courses, and does not offer visa support for international students.

 

 

nintendo labo

Nintendo and Institute of Play Bringing Nintendo Labo to Schools

Posted by | News, Switch | No Comments

Nintendo has partnered with non-profit educational company Institute of Play to provide Nintendo Labo kits to elementary schools across the US. The Nintendo Labo Classroom Program aims to reach 2,000 students between the ages of 8-11.

Nintendo Labo kits include DIY buildable cardboard pieces that kids (and adults) can integrate with the Joy-Con controllers of the Switch to create interactive playsets. Examples in the Variety Kit include a fishing rod, a piano, and a remote controlled car. They’re powered by the Toy-Con Garage software, which introduces basic programming language to a wide audience.

The Institute of Play is building a full-fledged curriculum for teachers on using Nintendo Labo in the classroom. The company is made up of educators, researchers, and game designers.

“We are always on the lookout for new tools and technologies that combine the best of learning with the spirit of play, and in Nintendo Labo we found an inspiring and innovative approach in both areas,” said Arana Shapiro, Co-Executive Director of the Institute of Play. “Teachers in the pilot program are already seeing the natural fit for Nintendo Labo in the classroom, and now we can bring that dynamic to schools across the country.”

A pilot program will initially roll out to schools in the New York area. Nintendo and the Institute of Play will use these classes to develop a teacher guide and lesson plans for using Nintendo Labo to teach programming and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math). The Nintendo Labo Teacher Guide will be available for free later this fall.

After the pilot program is complete, the Nintendo Labo Classroom Program will expand to 100 schools across the country. Each school will be provided with Switch systems and Nintendo Labo: Variety Kits, as well as the teacher guide. The program will run through the full school year.

The program is also being offered in Canada through Actua, Canada’s leading education-outreach organization for STEAM.

“The ingenuity of Nintendo Switch brings Nintendo Labo to life to provide a fun way for kids to explore basic STEAM topics together and be entertained while building a fundamental understanding of the technology behind them,” said Reggie Fils-Aime, Nintendo of America, President.  “We hope our programs in the United States and Canada encourage kids to explore, tinker, problem-solve and, in the process, get excited about design and technology – all while having fun.”

girl gamers

“Girl Gamers” are Three Times as Likely to Pursue STEM Degrees

Posted by | News | No Comments

A recent study published in the scientific journal Computers in Human Behavior found that young teenage women who were classified as heavy gamers (nine or more hours of gaming a week), were three times more likely to pursue a degree in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM).

Likewise, a startling 100% of young women who were already in STEM degrees identified themselves as gamers. The study shows that encouraging gaming for adolescent girls is likewise encouraging them to consider education and careers in STEM.

The research was funded by the British Academy and led by Dr. Anesa Hosein. Dr. Hosein is Program Director of PhD in Higher Education at Surrey and self-identifies as a “geek gamer.”

“Despite the pioneering work of people like Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Surrey’s own Daphne Jackson, the first female Physics professor, there are still too few female STEM role models for young women,” said Dr. Hosein. “Our research shows that those who study STEM subjects at degree level are more likely to be gamers, so we need to encourage the girl gamers of today to become the engineering and physics students and pioneers of tomorrow.”

Per the study, Dr. Hosein recommends that any young woman with a pre-disposition toward gaming should be empowered to make the connection between her hobby and the adjacent career fields. She suggests attending gaming panels and meeting STEM role models, and for educators to include gaming as part of STEM curriculum.

“It therefore makes sense, in the short-term, that educators seeking to encourage more take up of STEM subjects should target girl gamers, as they already may have a natural interest in these subjects,” said Dr. Hosein. “We need to get better at identifying cues early to recognize which girls may be more interested in taking up STEM degrees.”

Microsoft Unveils Windows 10 S Designed for Classrooms

Posted by | News, PC | No Comments

In a lengthy blog post Terry Myerson, Executive VP for Windows and devices at Microsoft, unveiled a brand new operating system. Windows 10 S, built upon Windows Pro, is designed specifically to be used by students in the classroom. Windows 10 S is launching this Summer.

“As part of our mission at Microsoft, we believe technology can be used as a tool to empower students and teachers to create the world of tomorrow,” writes Myerson. Myerson notes what many in tech and education have realized – tech skills and knowledge are woefully under-taught in schools. Computer science skills are increasingly in demand and continue rising with each passing year.

Back in my day we had Macintosh computers in the computer lab, but these days Microsoft Windows dominates in schools. Windows 10 S is a more closed system where all applications are acquired and run through the Windows Store. This helps streamlines performance but potentially limits what programs students can use, which has already drawn some criticism:

Windows 10 S does allow any teacher or admin to switch Windows 10 S to Windows 10 Pro, which allows them to install any app. But it’s designed to keep students in a contained and structured environment, which for K-12 may not be such a bad idea.

For college students and older, Microsoft has announced the Surface Laptop. The new tablet-like device is powered with Windows 10 S and boasts up to 14.5 hours of battery life. It features a 13.5″ screen and an i7 core processor. The Surface Laptops start at $999 and will launch on June 15. It is now available for pre-order.

Educators and students will be able to purchase a variety of Windows 10 S PCs starting at $189. It includes Minecraft: Education Edition and Microsoft Office 365. Windows 10 S will be launching this Summer.