dragon quest

Dragon Quest 11 Tips and Guide

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Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age is a massive game. For an RPG it’s very accessible and not particularly challenging, but there are a number of tips we can provide to help put you on the right path, especially if this is your first Dragon Quest game.

Follow Orders

Whenever an ally joins you for the first time, the AI will automatically handle them in combat. The AI is fairly competent, and you can change how you want them to spend their skills via the Tactics option at the start of any fight. However if you want to actually control them directly, you’ll need to set them to Follow Orders. You only need to do this once, and we’d recommend leaving it on for the rest of the game.

Handy Heal All

Dragon Quest 11 includes a convenient option to quickly top off your party HP in between battles. Simply open up the menu screen and hit Square (PS4) or X (XBO) to automatically apply healing magic and/or items to your party. It’s done in the most effective way possible, so you’ll never waste too much MP. Healing spells are generally cheap to cast, so keep everyone healthy!

Moving in Battle is Purely Aesthetic

Something that can easily confuse everyone when they first stat playing is the ability to manually move around in battle – it actually doesn’t do anything. Combat is entirely turn-based and doesn’t take movement into account at all. You can set the battle camera for a more fixed and dynamic view that we found more enjoyable.

Don’t Skip Too Many Fights

It’s painfully easy to avoid battles in Dragon Quest 11. Enemies are clearly visible on the map and their sight radius and speed are quite low. But you’ll still want to fight at least some enemies to keep up your experience and levels. Enemies can also be a great source of loot, either as random drops or by stealing with Erik.

It can also be very useful to fight at least one of each enemy in a zone. That way the enemy is added to your Defeated Monster List, which lets you see what items and materials they drop, in case you need to hunt it down later.

dragon quest 11

Half-Inch Hero

The first ally you acquire, Erik, is a classic rogue. You’ll want to unlock the first ability in his Guile tree, Half-Inch, as soon as possible. That gives him the ability to steal items from enemies. It’s a frustratingly low chance, however. Equip him with items that boost his Deftness, which raises his chance to steal. Often you can steal useful crafting items from enemies. Assuming a battle is going well, try and steal as often as you can. Note that you can only ever steal one item per enemy.

The Pep Power Itemized Kill gives you a guaranteed item from a single enemy. It’s worth doing every time you have the main character and Erik pepped up (the main character will need to learn Flame Slash, the first Sword skill, to unlock it). Check your Defeated Monster List for rare items that are worth going after.

Craft Everything

Dragon Quest 11’s crafting system is robust and rewarding. Crafting serves two purposes: crafting new equipment, and improving equipment. Often you can craft equipment better or equal to what’s available in stores using fairly easy-to-get materials (see above on not skipping fights). More importantly, crafting rewards Perfectionist Pearls, which you can use to Rework equipment. Every item can be improved up to +3, increasing its stats exponentially. Note that you can go from a +0 to a +3 in a single crafting session.

In the beginning it’s difficult to hit the right spot but the more you craft the more abilities you unlock and the more Focus you acquire. Eventually you’ll be able to craft the best equipment and keep it updated with minimal effort. Keep practicing! Note that you can only craft at campsites, but you can Zoom to any previous campsite in the world.

Stick to One Weapon Tree, But Switch When You Want

Everyone in Dragon Quest 11 has access to two or more weapon trees, but you’ll want to choose one and stick with it. This can be a tricky choice at first, but thankfully it’s incredibly easy to reset an entire skill tree’s worth of skill points at any save shrine or church, located in every town and campsite.

It’s not a bad idea to start some characters on one weapon tree, then switch them over later. For example, it’s very handy to give Erik a boomerang at first. Boomerangs hit multiple enemies and will act as one of your only AOE attacks until you get Veronica. Later you can switch him over to Knives, where he can eventually dual wield and apply Poison and Sleep.

Likewise Serena can wield a spear early on to help maximize your damage output. Later her melee attacks will fall off greatly compared to the others and you can comfortably switch her to Wands to boost her healing.

dragon quest 11

Here are our weapon recommendations for each character:

Main Character: Swords. Though he’s the only one who can wield GreatSwords, Sword + Shield provides a solid boost to defense and good skills. Work your way to the top of tree to get GigaSlash, Falcon Slash, and Dual Wielding.

Erik: Boomerangs initially, then Knives. As mentioned above, boomerangs are very handy as they hit everyone, but knives have much better abilities, and Erik can eventually dual wield them.

Veronica: Heavy Wands. Veronica has the highest Magical Might of any character. She’s the traditional offensive mage powerhouse and Heavy Wands will boost her magic. She’ll have enough MP to cast spells constantly, but you can always bonk ’em with the staff to get some MP back.

Serena: Spears first, then Wands. Serena’s melee attacks are decent when you first get her, and she can definitely help out in combat with a spear. Later switch her to Wands and keep her as your main healer.

Sylvando: Whips. Sylvando has a lot of options when it comes to weapons, but I wanted a whip wielder. Sylvando is rather unique in that his weapon skills aren’t nearly as exciting as his unique trees of Litheness and Showmanship. You’ll get way more usage out of Hot Lick, Fuddle Dance, and Hustle Dance than any of his weapon skills.

Jade: Spears have better abilities and more damage. Multithrust can do massive damage when she’s pepped up, with each hit capable of landing a crit. Note that she can still use both her Fisticuffs and Allure abilities regardless of her weapon type, and they often do a solid bit of damage.

Rab: Heavy Wands. You could play around with Claws at first. Like Serena his melee attacks aren’t half bad when you get him. But by then you’ve got much better melee fighters, and Rab is primarily a spellcaster.

[Spoiler]: Axes with a big ol’ shield. [spoiler] is the only character who can use Axes, and Axe abilities are crazy powerful, especially Parralax for single targets and Axes of Evil for multiple foes.

Dragon Quest

Prince (and Princess) Charming

Most of the Dragon Quest stats are self-explanatory, but Charm is a bit strange. Higher Charm leads to enemies occasionally losing a turn due to being enthralled with that hero. However, two of your allies use Charm for many of their abilities: Sylvando and Jade. Boosting Sylvando’s Charm stat increases the power of his Showmanship Tree, including the healing power of Hustle Dance. For Jade, Charm boosts her Allure tree.

It’s not necessarily worth boosting Charm to the exclusion of Resilience or Attack Power, but if you have the option, give those two all your extra Charm boosting equipment.

Metal Slimes Are Your Best Friends

Dragon Quest fans know to salivate when seeing the rare and elusive metal slime. These enemies are found very rarely accompanying other foes, and you should prioritize them immediately. They’re very hard to hit, immune to spells, and tend to run away, but you only have to hit them a few times to defeat them.

If you manage to kill one you’re rewarded with a massive amount of experience. Metal-specific abilities like Metalicker and Metal Slash can come in very handy, as well as any attack or weapon that hits multiple times.

There’s one unique Pep Power you can use to farm metal slimes. If the Main Character, Sylvando, and Jade are all pepped up, you can unleash the combo Pep Power “Electro Light,” transforming all enemies into metal slimes!

Stay Pepped

Your allies will enter a blue-hued Pepped up state upon dealing and/or taking a certain amount of damage. Their stats will be boosted for a number of turns, and they can also unleash powerful Pep Powers. Some of the most powerful moves involve Pep Powers with multiple heroes, but don’t unleash them too soon!

Using a Pep Power drains your Pep, so it’s better to stay Pepped up for as long as possible and enjoy the stat boost. You’ll know when your Pep is close to running out when the blue halo around the hero’s portrait begins to blink.

An interesting side effect to Pep is that it you can keep it for multiple battles. You can even switch party members out to store them in a Pepped up state for an upcoming boss fight.

Use these tips to get started on your journey to the World Tree. Good luck, Luminary!

jurassic world evolution

Jurassic World Evolution Tips and Tricks Guide

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Jurassic World Evolution isn’t a particularly challenging or demanding theme park sim, but it has its quirks, and does a poor job explaining many of its systems. On any of the remote tropical  islands within the Muertas Archipelago the Oooh-ing and Ahh-ing can quickly devolve into running and screaming. Or worse, you simply run out of money, whether through guests’ lawsuits or poor planning.

We’ve compiled a list of helpful tips to help prove that a dinosaur theme park can be a successful, and profitable, venture.

One Career, Six Islands

Jurassic World Evolution operates a bit differently than most building sims. You have a single career that carries over between islands. Your progress towards dinosaur DNA as well as all research unlocked at the Research Center carries over between each island park. Cash, however, is tied to whatever park you’re currently playing.

This means it’s a good idea to stay on an island even after hitting three stars and unlocking the next island. Since you should have a sizable cash flow by then, finish getting 100% on each dinosaur fossil you have access to as well as any research. This will make starting over again on the next island a bit easier.

jurassic world evolution

You should also try and complete each of the division Missions before moving on, as you cannot complete the next island’s Mission until the previous one.

The island parks are paused while you’re not running them. You can easily return to earlier islands after unlocking better dinosaurs and research, which will make attaining the full five stars much more manageable.

The sixth island, Isla Nublar, is the infamous site of Jurassic Park and Jurassic World, and also a big money-less sandbox. Build the park of your dreams!

Request Contracts

Each island will feature multi-step Missions for each of the three divisions: Science, Entertainment, and Security, as well as smaller, randomized Contracts. You don’t have to wait for these Contracts to periodically appear.

Go to the Control Center, and the Contracts tab in the lower left. From there you can Request a New Contract to randomly generate a new one. You can even choose from the three divisions. It may not be one you can complete in a timely fashion; you can always decline them without any repercussions.

Because of the chance for high cash rewards, you should always be working on a full queue of three Contracts at all times.

Jurassic World Evolution

Maintain Balance Between Divisions

It can be tempting to focus on increasing your reputation with only one of the three divisions in order to quickly unlock their rewards. Increasing reputation also comes with a nice cash loyalty bonus if you favor a certain division, and their building, should you build it (unlocked from the first island’s reputation), will yield more income.

However, you run the risk of sabotage from any of ignored divisions. That’s right, if you ignore their contracts and mission for too long and don’t fill up the bar, they will actively sabotage your park, including poisoning your dinosaurs and shutting down the power. This can create some devastating scenarios at inopportune times. Try to keep all three reputation bars steadily increasing to avoid any nasty sabotage.

Apply Building Upgrades

Remember that building upgrades aren’t automatically applied after you research them. You have to manually apply them to the appropriate building. If you research Improved Output 1.0, for example, go to a power station and click over to the upgrade tab to apply it.

Note that most upgrades cost a bit of power, so make sure you have a surplus.

Improved Ouput and Outage Protection are must-haves for every power station. The Ranger Station upgrades are also solid, given that you’ll be using them to do just about every task in your park.

Dino Care

Guests needs are important, but priority should always go to your dinosaurs. An unhappy dinosaur is a security risk and a huge financial liability. Viewing a dinosaur’s statistics will let you see their various needs and ratings for food, water, and population. The most important bar is Comfort. A distressed dinosaurs will slowly lose comfort. Once it reaches their red bar, it will attack the nearest fence and escape, wrecking havoc on nearby guests.

Some dinosaurs are much easier maintained than others. Typically more expensive, higher rated dinosaurs are more difficult to keep happy, and require very specific parameters of grass, forest, and population numbers, which is mostly discovered through trial and error (or this excellent spreadsheet).

Be especially wary of dinosaurs with a large red bar in their comfort level, like Tyrannosaurus Rex, Indominous Rex, and Velciraptor. Those dinosaurs will break out at the drop of a hat.

Jurassic World Evolution

Social vs. Population

Each dinosaur has two separate bars for Social and Population. Social is how many of that dinosaur’s own species they like to have around them. Large carnivores, for example, typically don’t like to compete, though you can house up to three Ceratosaurus fairly peacefully.

Some dinosaurs will panic if they don’t have enough of their own kind. Torosarus and Dracrex will immediately start panicking if they don’t have a buddy nearby, and preferably at least a handful.

Population is the total number of dinosaurs within an enclosure. While Dracorex loves having a couple of its own kind, its Population tolerance is actually low. Put more than about half a dozen dinosaurs with it and its unhappiness will lead to attacked fences, escapes, and constant headaches for you.

On the other hand, the hadorsaurus family (Corythosaurus, Edmontosaurus, Parasaurolophus) have large Social and Population thresholds – they love having lots of friendly herbivores around them. Use them along with other friendly, social herbivores like Triceratops and Brachiosaurus to fill out a large mega-herbivore enclosure in every park.

jurassic world evolution

Double The Fences

Something I discovered by accident is that you can build fences on top of fences, creating a double perimeter. The new fence will automatically wrap around the old. It’s not a bad idea to double the fence line for your more ornery dinosaurs, giving you some extra time to either fix the dinosaur’s needs once they start attacking, or fire up the ACU and Ranger jeep for the inevitable break out.

Wildlife Photographer

If you don’t like getting up-close with your dinosaurs, you’re playing the wrong game. Manually driving a Ranger vehicle lets you take pictures of your dinosaurs. Photographing certain dinosaur actions, like hunting, fighting, and eating, can satisfy some Contracts, but it’s also a nice bit of side income when you don’t have any pressing concerns and you’re waiting for the coffers to fill.

Taking pictures doesn’t cost you anything but time and can net thousands and even tens of thousands of dollars. Try to stage as many dinosaurs as possible in a frame.

Mixing Carnivores and Herbivores

Generally meat-eaters and plant-eaters aren’t going to get along very well, even in a very large enclosure with multiple goats running around. T-Rex wants to hunt, after all. However, there are a few successful combinations.

Dinosaur size is the biggest thing to be aware of when mixing. If herbivores are significantly larger than the carnivores, the carnivores won’t be able to mess with them. Though the herbivores may feel panicked on occasion. There are some exceptions. Try putting several Velociraptors in a pen with a defenseless Corythosaurus. Maybe save your game first.

An example of a successful mixed enclosure is a handful of Deinonychus with a pair of Ankylosaurus. The Deinonychus won’t be able to touch the lumbering tank-like Anks. Just make sure the enclosure is big enough where the Anks won’t feel threatened all the time, and put their feeders on opposite ends.

jurassic world evolution

Killer Dinosaurs

In the early stages of each park every single dinosaur matters. Everything outside of the Struthiomimus is fairly expensive. You definitely don’t want them eating each other.

But once money becomes less of a concern, you can employ the dubious tactic of breeding dinosaurs for the sole purpose of feeding them to your big carnivores. These large meat-eaters, such as the early game Ceratosaurus, can attain very large star ratings by fighting and killing other dinosaurs, like Torosarus.

Modify the genes of your large predators to increase their attack and defense ratings, then breed unmodified herbivores with weaker stats, but who can still fight, such as Torosaurus. Winning battles will earn them Combat Infamy and a bonus to their star rating. It’s a particularly good tactic for islands where you don’t have space for more dinosaurs and enclosures, such as Isla Pena.

Give your star predators time to heal between bouts. You can also hop in a Ranger jeep and shoot them with medical darts, which will actually heal them during the fight!

Use the Management View

The eye icon is the Management View, and it lets you cycle through several different overlays of your park. This is important to see where you need to build your guest amenities such as gift shops.  and fast food.

Guest needs are primarily built around two areas in your park – hotels, and all of your various viewing galleries, platforms, and gyrospheres. While it may make aethsetic sense to drop a row of shops and eating at your park entrance, it’s not going to make your guests happy unless they are near a hotel or a dinosaur enclosure.

Think of all these guest facilities as having a hidden radius around them, and you want that radius to touch as many of your viewing galleries as possible. Since hotels house a large number of guests, you should also surround them in food, drinks, and fun.

We Need More Burgers

Every guest building can only serve a certain number of guests, depending on how many staff members you have empoyed. It’s hidden behind the dollar sign tab on each buildling, which also lets you adjust which item is being sold and for how much.

If you see the number of guests are full (like 320/320), click on Manage Staff to to hire more staff and accomadate more people. Always do this before buying an entirely second building to fill the same needs. On an island, space is a premium!

One Big Monorail

Every park has a Transport Rating, and the only way to improve it is with a monorail. The monorail’s job is to ferry folks from your park entrance to your hotels, reducing the downtime between arrival and dinosaur viewing.

If you go to the Management View you can also see that monorails act as mobile viewing galleries. Build them so they weave their way around and through your dinosaur enclosures to improve your Dinosaur Visibility rating.

A single monorail track should be able to cover your entire park. Stick a a few stations near hotels and hotspot locations, and your Transport Rating should remain solid all the way to five stars.

jurassic world evolution

Clever Girl

Fans of the movies will recognize the Velociraptor as being particularly dangerous. It’s no different in Jurassic World Evolution. Their Comfort threshold is exceedingly low, meaning they’ll get upset and attack the fences at the slightest provocation, whether it’s too many trees, too few of their own kind, or adverse weather conditions. This makes raptors rarely worth the headache of breeding them compared to other dinosaurs – but you’ll need them to complete several Island Missions.

To avoid instant Social concerns breed multiple raptors at a time and release them one after the other. What could possibly go wrong?

 

monster hunter: world

Monster Hunter: World Tips and Guide for New Players

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Monster Hunter: World may be the most accessible game in the series (read our review) but it’s still a tricky game to jump into, particularly if you’re completely new to the Monster Hunter series. We’ve compiled some helpful tips and explained some important mechanics to help start novice hunters on the right path to hunting and slaying.

No Level, All Gear

In Monster Hunter: World your progression is tied directly to your gear, as well as a single Hunter Rank number. This number could be considered your level, just without all the normal RPG benefits of stat increases and abilities. Your HR determines how difficult of a mission you can accept, as well as unlocking new areas, quests, and facilities in Astera. Every quest has an HR requirement, and you can never join one that’s above your HR. Keep that in mind when playing multiplayer.

Playing through Assigned Quests, or main story missions, will naturally raise your HR level.

Since your power comes directly from your gear, forging new weapons and armor is not only paramount to your success, it’s the primary method of essentially leveling up. See below for more tips on weapons and armor, but in general you should be stopping by the Workshop frequently and gathering what you need to forge the best equipment available to you.

monster hunter: world

The Easiest Starter Weapons

You begin with the basic iron version of all 14 weapon types, which is both very handy and incredibly overwhelming. Stick with the Sword and Shield at first for a solid baseline into standard melee combat, including both blocking and dodging.

From there you can experiment with the Great Sword and Hammer for slower but weightier attacks, the Dual Blades if you want to zip around quickly, or the Bow if you want to attack from range. There’s no wrong answer and much of your personal enjoyment will come from finding that right weapon set that works for you.

The weapons I would gently discourage completely new players away from initially are the very slow Lance and Gunlance, the Bowguns for micromanaging tons of different ammo, the Hunting Horn for its musical mini-game, and the Insect Glaive for adding a whole new dimension of buffs, kinsect customization, and aerial attacks.

Before heading out to the field with a new weapon, go to your room on the first floor and speak to your housecat Palico to transport to the Training Area. Here you can easily switch your equipment to test out new weapons. Basic combos will also be helpfully displayed right on the screen, similar to the training modes of fighting games. Experiment and discover what you enjoy.

Gather Your Party

Monster Hunter: World automatically populates online sessions, but you’ll need to select Join Quest from a quest board (or your handler) to actually join a multiplayer hunt – or Post a Quest and hope someone joins.

SOS flares are a useful way to find a greater search of online matches, provided the person in the hunt has fired a flare seeking help. You can do the same thing during any quest or Expedition after the first Great Jagras hunt in the main story.

monster hunter: world

If you’re wanting to play consistently with friends, the best method is to set up a Squad. Squads are Monster Hunter’s version of guilds. Create a Squad, then use the Invite a Friend option from the Start menu to invite them into your session, then invite them to your squad. From then on whenever you play in Squad Sessions, you’ll be playing a private server with your friends, and can easily join each other’s quests.

Expeditions, Investigations, and You

There are several different kinds of quests and missions in Monster Hunter: World. Most involve hunting a specific monster or group of monsters within set parameters, such as a limited number of faints and a varying time limit.

There are four options when you go to the quest board, and a fifth option for free roaming. We’ve explained them below.

Assigned Quests: These are the main story missions. You’ll need to complete them to progress your Hunter Rank. Since they feature cutscenes they are a hassle to play in multiplayer, since no one can join a mission if one player still has cutscenes to watch. A reminder should pop up once you can use an SOS flare, which is a sign that others can join.

Optional Quests: These are organized by Hunter Rank (represented by stars). You’ll unlock more as you complete the Assigned Quests. Optional Quests include standard hunts and captures, as well as gathering missions that can unlock new Canteen ingredients. You can also unlock Optional Quests by talking to people with the familiar yellow exclamation (!) above their heads in Astera.

Investigations: You can register Investigations at the Resource Center. Investigations are unlocked by battling, hunting, and tracking monsters. They’re designed to repeat multiple times and provide bonus rewards in addition to whatever you carve and find during the hunt. They’re also perfect for multiplayer outings, and soon you’ll be drowning in dozens of options. Pay close attention to the parameters; some allow only a single faint or a breezy 15 minute window, though increased challenges come with better rewards.

Events: Event Quests are unique quests provided by Capcom for a limited time. They often involve battling monsters within the arena, and can come with their own unique rewards.

Expeditions: Expeditions isn’t an option in the quest board. Instead you simply open up your map while in town, go to the World Map view, and select an area to explore. This lets you hunt in a zone without any set goals or time limits. It’s useful for gathering materials without worrying about the clock, though you can certainly hunt monsters as well. There’s also a few NPCs scattered around the zones you can talk to who offer special Bounties to complete. Remember to turn them in at the Resource Center.

Bounty Hunter

With the Resource Center (Tradeyard, near the entrance) you can Manage Investigations (see above) and Register Bounties. Bounties are like errands that you’re always working toward, no matter if you’re on a main quest or free roaming in an Expedition. You can register up to six bounties at any time, and they range from completing quests to hunting certain monsters to gathering certain types of materials.

Remember to check the Resource Center between quests for rewards and always have the max number of bounties registered. Bounties are a great way to earn Armor Spheres for upgrading your armor (see below).

Wear the Best Gear

You’ll be unlocking new armor sets at a rapid clip in the early game, as each new monster adds new armor pieces. The most important stat to look for is just boring old defense. You won’t need to worry about Elemental Resistances until a bit later in the game, when monsters start spewing poison or breathing fire.

monster hunter: world

Every piece of armor can be upgraded using Armor Spheres. These items are given as rewards for completing Investigations and Bounties. Go to the Workshop and Select Upgrade, and use the Armor Spheres to boost the defense stat of your various armor pieces. Each piece can only be boosted a set number of times, providing a natural ceiling for the set. This is motivation to keep crafting better armor!

Keep Your Blade Sharp

Eleven of the 14 weapons are melee weapons, and they need to be periodically sharpened. Weapon sharpness is represented by a small bar below your stamina in the upper left corner. As you strike a foe your weapon dulls, and the bar drops from green to yellow to red. You’ll do less damage and begin to see your weapon bounce off the monster’s hide with an insulting CLANG.

You need to use your Whetstone item (which is always equipped, like the fishing rod) and spend a few seconds sharpening. Since this leaves you completely vulnerable, it’s best to do it when the monster is retreating to a new area, or when it’s tied up with your Palico or other hunters.

Note that weapons are not created equal when it comes to their sharpness gauge. Typically Metal weapons will stay sharp longer (more green bar) than Bone weapons.

Affinity = Crit Chance

There’s a lot of things that aren’t well explained in Monster Hunter: World, and Affinity is one of them. You’ll find Affinity as a percentage stat on every weapon. It’s your chance to critically hit, doing increased damage. If it’s negative it means there’s a chance you could do reduced damage. A 20% positive Affinity means one in five hits should do increased damage.

Don’t neglect the Affinity percentage, and make sure to factor it when comparing weapons. Faster weapons, like the Dual Blades, greatly benefit from a high Affinity rating as you’ll be landing that boosted damage more often. Slower weapons like Hammers may prefer higher raw damage coupled with a negative Affinity, finding the trade-off more than acceptable.

Research Points

Research Points are earned when gathering materials, examining monster tracks, breaking body parts, and slaying and capturing monsters. Basically everything you do in the wild nets research points. They’re added to a currency-like pool you can use to forge Palico equipment as well as purchase meals at the Canteen.

Each monster also has its own Research Level, which you can view at the Ecological Research (the giant stack of books at the Tradeyard entrance, near the Resource Center). You have to actually visit the Ecological Research to apply any earned points, so make stopping there part of your routine in town. The points will unlock new information about monsters in your Hunter’s Notes (see below) as well as make tracking them via Scoutflies much easier. At level 3 the monster will show up on your minimap when you’re tracking it!

monster hunter: world

Know Thy Enemy

A good hunter gathers as much information about their prey as they can. On the pause menu you can access your Hunter’s Notes and look up detailed information of all the monsters you’ve encountered.

You’ll unlock additional information the more you hunt a monster, including its specific weak points (usually the head and tail) as well as any elemental and status weaknesses and resistances. If you’re hunting a specific monster it can be useful (and eventually, critical) to bring along the right weapon, though you needn’t really worry about it too much in the beginning. The most important information is knowing which body parts of the monster to target for extra damage.

Never Hunt on an Empty Stomach

Eating meals is usually not an important part of an action game, but it’s incredibly helpful in Monster Hunter: World.

In your home base of Astera you’ll find the Canteen on the third floor, manned (catted?) by a team of Palico cooks. You can pay either with money or research points, and you should have plenty of both.

Meals can boost your health, stamina, and provide useful buffs. It’s even more critical to eat when playing solo or with one other hunter, as your Palico receives several buffs as well (which in turn have a chance of buffing you).

monster hunter: world

Certain Optional Quests can unlock new ingredients at the Canteen, which you can use to customize your meals to create the perfect combination of stat boosts and buffs.

The effects of a meal last until you complete a quest, or until you faint. You can always eat a meal at campsites out in the world as well, just head over to the little oven near the tent.

Obey Your Thirst

Potions and Mega-Potions will be your primary means of health recovery. Gather Herbs and Honey and keep well-stocked at all times. Eventually you’ll unlock the Palico Vigorwasp Spray for a quick heal, and the Health Booster item for healing over time.

Later you can craft Mega-Nutrients to add to your max health, Energy Drinks to boost your stamina (and stave off Sleep effects), and Armorskin to boost your defense. Check the ingredients you need by opening your Crafting Menu from the Start Menu and when checking your Item Box next to the quest boards in Astera, or at any campsite. You can set items to auto-craft whenever you have the ingredients.

Note that like the meals, any potion effects you have will disappear if you faint.

Dino-Rider

It’s easiest with the aerial-fighting Insect Glaive but every hunter can attempt to land on the back of a monster to mount it. Use the terrain and items like the Glider Mantle to land on a monster’s back.

If you manage to mount a monster you will enter into a quick-time mini-game as you repeatedly slash at it with your carving knife while it attempts to throw you off. If you stay on you’ll eventually pull out your weapon and deal a massive blow. It’s a challenging, but rewarding maneuver to master in any battle.