jurassic park danger

Jurassic Park Danger! Review

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Game publisher Ravensburger is celebrating Jurassic Park’s 25th anniversary with Jurassic Park Danger!, an adventure strategy game that pits the heroes (and victims) of the first film against the rampaging dinosaurs on Isla Nublar.

By melding together fun board game mechanics from Euro-style games, Jurassic Park Danger! is far more compelling and rewarding than many family games found in the Target gaming aisle. Its dedication to the source material is immensely rewarding for fans of the 1993 film – but be prepared for the dinosaurs to come out on top more often than not.

Man Creates Dinosaurs, Dinosaurs Eat Man

Jurassic Park Danger! is both cooperative and competitive. It’s designed for 2-5 players. One player always takes the role of the rampaging dinosaurs on the island – specifically a dilophosaurus, velociprator, and Tyrannosaurus Rex. Each dinosaur is represented by wonderful little dino-meeples with printed pictures.

The other players each play one of ten color-coded characters from the film, including Dr. Alan Grant, Dr. Ian Malcolm, Dr. Ellie Sattler, and park owner John Hammond. Every player (including the dinosaur player) gets their own character mat and deck of cards.

The island board isn’t quite a faithful recreation of the park. Instead it’s randomly constructed every game through the modular hexagonal inner pieces, not unlike The Settlers of Catan. This randomizes the locations of cliffs, electric fences, dinosaur spawn points, and some of the objectives. To maintain a semblance of balance, the main objectives are always placed at the cardinal directions of the island, with human players always starting in the middle.

The human players’ goals are to active three locations, such as the control center, then escape off the island via the helicopter. If the humans can collectively get three characters off the island, they win.

jurassic park danger

At the same time, each character has their own specific goals, listed on their character mats. Like everything else, they’re drawn from the film. Ray Arnold, for example, must go to the maintenance shed location to earn his goal token before he can escape (hopefully a better fate than in the movie). These goals help add an interesting wrinkle to players’ plans – particularly when a character dies.

Clever Girl

The dinosaur players’ goal is to eliminate three human characters. Crucially, Jurassic Park Danger! works around player elimination by letting the humans play a new character with a fresh deck of cards. In fact, the manual very plainly states on the first page that there’s a good chance the character you start with won’t survive to make it off the island!

The low odds of survival is due to the card playing and health mechanic. Every round every player selects a card and places it face down on their sheet. The dinosaur player always goes first, revealing their movement capabilities and attempting to maneuver and ambush as many humans as possible. When a dinosaur enters a human space, the dinosaur attacks, and the human has to permanently lose a card. That’s bad news for humans, because they need to play those cards to get around the island.

The humans all have similar cards in their hands: Run, Climb, Sneak, and Distract. Running, climbing and sneaking offer different means of traveling around the map, but you’ll need to roll a dice to accomplish some of them.

jurassic park dangerI like that all the characters vary slightly, and aren’t just a simple aesthetic change. Tim, Hammond’s grandson, is slightly better at sneaking but not so great at climbing, for example.

Additionally, each character has special ability cards they can deploy. Lex’s I’m a Hacker card let’s her reroll a dice. Nedry can turn a single electric fence off or on, while Grant can rescue a nearby character by moving them into his space.

Playing multiple characters with different goals and abilities makes the game far more challenging for human players than the dinosaur player. Humans must also coordinate their actions to accomplish as much as they can while they’re still alive.

It’s far easier for the dinosaur player to use their unique abilities – like the dilophosaurus spit – to spread their attacks, block paths, and generally wear down the humans.

While it’s fun to watch both sides sneak around and out maneuver each other, it’s less enjoyable to lose your human character simply because you slowly ran out of cards to play. The balance feels particularly painful with less human players, as you have far fewer options to survive the onslaught of attacks. In half a dozen plays I’ve never seen the human players win, though they have come close.

The Rating

Jurassic Park Danger! is recommended for Ages 10+. Since movement is tied to card choice, and humans start with a full hand of all 10 cards, every single choice is strategic and tactical. Characters are eliminated, but players are not.

While Jurassic Park Danger! is suitable for families, it’s also aimed squarely at nostalgic fans of the original film.

The Takeaway

I count Jurassic Park as one of my all-time favorite films, and Jurassic Park Danger! absolutely nails the themes, style, and story beats remarkably well. The randomized board setup and ten characters provide a wealth of replay value, and the wooden meeples and card-playing strategy reflect the game’s Eurogame roots rather than a mass-market family game. I didn’t think I’d ever see a solid board game adaptation using the original Jurassic Park license, but life finds a way.

into the breach

Into the Breach Review

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Available On: PC

Pacific Rim meets Chess isn’t exactly the most common elevator pitch for indie games, yet it perfectly describes Into the Breach, the long-awaited sophomore release from beloved FTL: Faster Than Light developers Subset Games.

Into the Breach successfully retains all the fun roguelike challenges and tactical strategy of FTL while minimizing most randomized frustrations, creating a compelling tactical board game.

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Play Holy Potatoes We’re in Space on iOS this Week

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Daylight Studios is bringing their tactical spaceship adventure Holy Potatoes! We’re in Space?! to iOS this Thursday, March 1 for $6.99. An Android release will follow soon after.

“We have reworked the UI in Holy Potatoes! We’re in Space?! and made font sizes bigger and easier to read, and also increased the size of UI elements and buttons to make playing Holy Potatoes! We’re in Space?! as comfortable as possible on mobile phones and tablets,” said Faizan Abid, producer at Daylight Studios.

The rogue-like adventure stars a humorous cast of anthropomorphic ship captains and scientists. There’s a lot of fun pop culture references and plenty of veggie puns. It’s also a solid strategy game, with turn-based combat and lots of interesting weapon varieties. Read our review on the PC version, which released almost exactly a year ago.

Daylight Studios previously ported their first Holy Potatoes game, Holy Potatoes! A Weapon Shop?! to mobile devices last year. The third game in the series, Holy Potatoes! What the Hell?! also released last year, on PC. It’s about cooking (in Hell).

Holy Potatoes! We’re in Space?! will be available on iOS on March 1, later on Android. It’s not rated by the ESRB, but seemed appropriate for most kids, though they may not get all the many, many sci-fi references.

Civilization VI

Civilization VI Fall 2017 Update Will Expand Religion

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Civilization VI is getting a large Fall 2017 Update soon. In a blog-style news post Firaxis developer Sarah Darney explains what’s being worked on, including a large focus on religion.

“We heard your requests for a deeper overall experience – and took that to heart with revamped religious combat,” writes Darney. “Religious units can now exert Zone of Control and receive Flank and Support bonuses in religious combat. Meanwhile, the Guru religious support unit can heal nearby religious units. Finally, the Religion Lens has been overhauled to improve overall usability and readability. You’ll also find UI touches, such as religion indicators on unit flags, to remove all guesswork on where a unit’s allegiance lies.”

New content is also being added to the religion side of Civ 6, including two new Pantheons, and new Founder, Follower, Enhancer, and Worship Beliefs. These new beliefs will unlock two new religious buildings as well as a new religious unit, the warrior monk.

In addition to religion, the Fall 2017 Update will also improve the much-maligned AI as well as the interface. In particular the AI’s use of oceans and navies is being improved, which will hopefully make water-covered maps as challenging as land maps – a frequent balance issue in Civ games.

For UI changes, menus have been made more moddable and the Diplomacy screen more intuitive.

There’s more coming to the Fall 2017 Update, but for now Firaxis isn’t even providing a release date yet. The previous big update, the Summer 2017 Update, also worked on AI improvements.

Civilization VI released almost exactly one year ago for PC (read our review). It was well-received by critics and fans, though notably feels like a step down compared to Civilization V’s several years worth of updates, patches, and expansions. Civ 5 still maintains more active players, though both games are within the top 30 games played on Steam.