Save on Indie Games for Switch in the Nindies New Year Sale

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Part of the Nintendo Switch’s success is its embrace of indie games, which Nintendo has dubbed, ‘Nindies.’ To celebrate the New Year in 2018, several of last year’s indie releases on the Switch are on sale, up to 35% off. The Nindies New Year sale ends January 15.

There’s a nice mix of puzzle games, cooperative multiplayer, shoot ’em ups, and rhythm racers. I can personally give a thumbs up to Death Squared and Thimbleweed Park.

  • Death Squared – $11.24 (25% off)
  • GoNNER – $6.99 (30% off)
  • Graceful Explosion Machine – $8.99 (30% off)
  • INVERSUS Deluxe – $9.74 (35% off)
  • Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime – $9.99 (33% off)
  • Semispheres – $6.99 (30% off)
  • Severed – $9.99 (33% off)
  • Thimbleweed Park – $14.99 (25% off)
  • Thumper – $13.39 (33% off)

Nintendo is also running a contest for a chance to win free codes for each of the Nindies on sale. You add two entries into the pool by visiting the Nintendo EShop, and by retweeting the Nintendo Europe account. You’ll have to fill out your name and email as an official entry. The contest ends January 11.

In related news, all the indie devs involved in the Nindies New Year sale came together yesterday for a Reddit Ask Me Anything thread.

The Nindies New Year sale ends January 15.


nintendo switch

Nintendo Switch is the Fastest-Selling Console of All Time

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It’s no surprise by now that Nintendo had a stellar year in 2017, thanks to the hugely successful Nintendo Switch. This week Nintendo proudly shared an impressive stat: the Nintendo Switch has become the fastest-selling home video game system in the United States. The Switch has sold more than 4.8 million units in its first 10 months of release, according to Nintendo’s internal sales numbers. The previous record holder was Nintendo’s own Wii, which sold 4 million units in the same time frame.

“Fans across the country have experienced the joy of playing their favorite games at home or on the go,” said Reggie Fils-Aime, Nintendo of America’s President and COO. “Now that many more people have received Nintendo Switch systems for the holidays, we look forward to bringing them fun new surprises in 2018 and beyond.”

The Switch has been bolstered by an incredibly strong lineup of first party games. Not every year gives us mainline Mario and Zelda games. Both The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey were strong contenders for Game of the Year. Nintendo revealed that 60% of Switch owners purchased Super Mario Odyssey, while 55% own Breath of the Wild. Mario Kart 8 Deluxe also surpassed 50% ownership rate.

The other big success story is the amount of third party support that has flocked to the Switch. Nintendo received a lot of justifiable flak for the lack of third party games over the last decade with the Wii and Wii U. Big developers like Bethesda, Capcom, and Ubisoft have flocked to the new console with AAA games like Skyrim, Street Fighter, and Mario + Rabbids: Kingdom Battle. Indie companies are also developing for the Switch, porting favorites like Stardew Valley, SteamWorld Dig 2, and Overcooked.

As noted in our Most Anticipated Games list, there’s a host of games to be excited about for the Switch in 2018, including new Yoshi, new Kirby, and Bayonetta 3. And down the road there’s Metroid Prime 4 and that mysterious Switch-focused Pokémon game. Right now it’s good to be Nintendo, and even better to be a Nintendo fan.


game of the year

Pixelkin’s 2017 Game of the Year

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Sometimes our favorite game of the year comes as a complete surprise. Not this year. We proudly declare The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild as Pixelkin’s 2017 Game of the Year.

Breath of the Wild was one of the most anticipated games of the year. Not only was it the first 3D Zelda since 2011’s Skyward Sword on the Wii, but it was also a launch title for the Nintendo Switch, which has become a huge success for Nintendo.

The story reinforces themes of failure and redemption. Link wakes up to a bleak Hyrule where he was defeated a century ago, guided by the spirits and voices of the past. Monsters roam free, and a malevolent force, Ganon, swirls ominously around the ruins of Hyrule Castle. You could head there right after acquiring the glider and completing the wonderfully crafted opening hours atop the plateau, or strike off in any direction and explore.

Most open world games feature post-apocalyptic hellscapes, mature writing, and violent action. But this is Nintendo. Breath of the Wild features tropical beaches, staggering cliffs, dense jungles, and dangerous volcanoes. The world still feels like Hyrule, yet it reaches that perfect compromise between expansive and densely packed with hidden secrets and treasures.

Breath of the Wild boldly breaks many of the standard Zelda conventions, most notably the dungeon design. Instead of a steady progression of marquee dungeon crawls, Link can find over 100 shrines scattered around the world. These shrines cleverly employ challenging physics-based puzzles akin to levels in Portal using the several excellent tools you have at your disposal, such as magnetizing blocks and freezing water.

Completing shrines unlocks additional health and stamina, making it an important and fun side activity and a great excuse to explore a world stuffed with things to do. Shield surf down cliffs, hunt gigantic dragons, search for ingredients to upgrade your gear, discover hundreds (!) of Korok seeds to expand your inventory, take selfies in front of shooting stars, and tackle the mini-dungeons within the four Divine Beasts to weaken Ganon’s hold.

Nintendo Switch

Breath of the Wild was the vanguard for one of Nintendo’s best years in recent memory. It’s not every year we get a new Nintendo console, new Mario, and new Zelda, not to mention well-received sequels for Splatoon and Xenoblade Chronicles.

After some very lackluster console cycles in the Wii and Wii U, Nintendo has come roaring back, and that’s good for gaming, and especially gaming families. Breath of the Wild is single-player only, but remains a wonderfully enjoyable game for the family to gather around, between the cartoony art and creature designs, the physical combat system, and the story of courage and perseverance. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is destined to enter the pantheon of all-time greatest games, and easily warrants our Game of the Year for 2017.