the game awards

God of War, Red Dead Redemption 2 Top The Game Awards Nominations

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The Game Awards has revealed the list of nominees in each of the 22 categories for 2018. God of War and Red Dead Redemption 2 lead the pack with an astounding eight nominations each. In total over 100 games and people have been nominated. The Game Awards will air on December 6 in Los Angeles, CA, and streamed live online.

Rockstar Games doesn’t release many games, but when they do, they tend to make a bit of a splash in the industry. In addition to Game of the Year Red Dead Redemption 2 is up for Best Action/Adventure, Best Game Direction, Best Narrative, Best Art Direction, Best Score/Music, Best Audio Design, and Best Performance for Roger Clark as Arthur Morgan.

God of War was an incredibly successful sequel to the long-running franchise. It features an older Kratos shepherding his son through a world of Norse mythology. It’s up for all of the exact same categories, with the Best Performance nod to Christopher Judge as Kratos.

The Game of the Year category has been expanded to six games (previously five). Celesete, Spider-Man, Monster Hunter: World, and Assassin’s Creed Odyssey make up the other games.

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild won the Game of the Year award at last year’s The Game Awards.

Anyone can vote for their favorite games in each category, once every 24 hours. We’ve listed some of the big categories below.

Game of the Year

  • Assassin’s Creed Odyseey
  • Celeste
  • God of War
  • Marvel’s Spider-Man
  • Monster Hunter: World
  • Red Dead Redemption 2

Best Action Game

  • Call of Duty: Black Ops 4
  • Dead Cells
  • Destiny 2: Forsaken
  • Far Cry 5
  • Mega Man 11

Best Action-Adventure Game

  • Assassin’s Creed Odyseey
  • God of War
  • Marvel’s Spider-Man
  • Red Dead Redemption 2
  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider

red dead redemption 2

Best Ongoing Game

  • Destiny 2: Forsaken
  • Fortnite
  • No Man’s Sky
  • Overwatch
  • Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege

Best Family Game

  • Mario Tennis Aces
  • Nintendo Labo
  • Overcooked 2
  • Starlink: Battle for Atlas
  • Super Mario Party

Best Independent Game

  • Celeste
  • Dead Cells
  • Into the Breach
  • Return of the Obra Dinn
  • The Messenger

Winners will be announced during the live show on Dec. 6.

battle princess madelyn

How a Young Daughter, a Late Dog, and an 80’s Platformer Inspired Battle Princess Madelyn

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When your child is having a rough time, many fathers would bring home a teddy bear, or take them out for ice cream. But for pixel artist and indie game developer Christopher Obritsch, he decided to make a game.

“[My daughter] Maddi was bullied in daycare and at school,” says Obritsch. “The boys picked on her, telling her she couldn’t do things because she was a girl. I remember being very angry. I wanted to do something to cheer her up. I have scoliosis so I’m not exactly the playful dad I wish I was – so I make up for it in the only ways I know how.”

Battle Princess Madelyn was born, a retro-inspired platformer starring a pixelated version of Obritsch’s young daughter.

“I recently had left my full time job at a game studio near where I’m located. I had the money to do something but not at the scale it ended up being,” says Obritsch. “And since the game was for Maddi, I wanted to do everything I could with it. And so we came to Kickstarter.” The Kickstarter campaign launched on Maddi’s fifth birthday. “I thought, what a great way to prove to Maddi that she really can do whatever she wants to do.”

As many indie game projects inevitably go, Battle Princess Madelyn ended up as a much larger game than what was originally designed. The Kickstarter campaign was a big success, reaching over CA$ 200,000 with over 3,400 backers. It’s openly inspired by Obritsch’s all-time favorite game, Ghouls ‘N Ghosts, a challenging 16-bit action-platformer from the 80s.

“I like the dark horror themed stuff. Always have. So seeing Ghouls ‘N Ghosts when I was a kid? Awesome,” says Obritsch. “My favorite movies of all time all sport dead guys or people fighting dead guys – BeetleJuice, Robocop, Ghostbusters, Evil Dead 2, etc. I loved drawing skeletons when I was kid – gross stories that got my parents called in to talk to the teacher.”

Obritsch’s love of the game fueled a passion for pixel art and programming, and eventually a career in multimedia and graphic designer. He got into making games as a hobby, where his new bouncing baby served as his muse. “I ended up doing a very early game for Maddi. One of the levels ended up a 3D shoot ’em up where she is on my back and we’re flying through rainbows and shooting bumble bees and crows while picking up coins. I ended up getting discovered by an ad agency for a musician and almost won the Brit Music Awards that year for Best Interactive Video.”

Obritsch credits his daughter Madelyn as his Creative Director for Battle Princess Madelyn. “She either draws me pictures or sits with me and tells me what to do. She’s my harshest critic!” He recalls a specific instance where five year-old Maddi came home from a friend’s house with a new drawing that she was very proud of.

“She explained a boss fight she had designed. It’s a giant cat you shoot in the bum, but you have to feed it to get it to turn around. I was just shocked – she had come up with a strategy for a boss fight on her own. That was a proud daddy moment,” says Obritsch. “I’m hoping to find that picture for the Kickstarter art book.”

battle princess madelyn

Another member of Obritsch’s family made it into Battle Princess Madelyn, their late dog Fritzy, whose passing partially inspired the story mode. “The story kind of came into play when we knew the real Fritzy was going to be leaving us soon. The intro of the game then started off with Fritzy getting blasted and becoming a ghost dog.”

Young Maddi was very attached to the family dog and took his passing especially hard. “Maddi would talk at night about becoming a vet and making a blue pill to make Fritzy all better. It was heart-breaking to listen to. I decided to put him in the game so she could keep him forever in some form.”

The result was a friendly companion that returns to the titular Battle Princess after his untimely death in the intro. Ghost Fritzy gain new powers over the course of the story, and is capable of resurrecting Madelyn if she falls in battle. “She loves Ghost Fritzy and thinks its very cute,” says Obritsch.

battle princess madelynDesigning Battle Princess Madelyn has been a labor of love, but with Kickstarter came bigger responsibilities and longer hours. “I work now more than I ever have,” says Obritsch. “We averaged out that I work about 126 hours a week for the past three years. It’s taken a toll on me both mentally and physically.”

Obritsch adds that because he works from home, the long hours don’t bother him as much. He sneaks in breaks with his family whenever he can (his wife Lina works as the company CFO, and directed the game’s trailer). “I have the option of going upstairs and seeing my family if I need a 10-minute break,” he says. “And Maddi sits with me a lot while making the game. She has her desk right next to mine where she draws.”

For the future, Causal Bit Games plans on making a sequel to Battle Princess Madelyn. In fact, there’s a hidden ending that teases the sequel that may involve Obritsch’s youngest daughter Sofia. But he notes that he’s also looking at a break from platformers, and possibly even retiring from pixel art altogether and moving on to something bigger.

“As stressful as it’s been making [Battle Princess Madelyn], I have loved every moment of the creative process,” says Obritsch. “It was wonderful to share this kind of a project with Maddi. To show her that we really can do whatever we set our minds to – no matter what people say or think. It’s been a wonderful journey. And now our youngest daughter Sofia will need her own game as well!”

Battle Princess Madelyn is coming later this year to PC, PlayStation 4, Switch, Xbox One, Wii U, and PS Vita.

dragon quest xi

Dragon Quest 11 Reaches 4 Million Copies Sold

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Apparently we weren’t the only ones to enjoy Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age (read our review). Square Enix announced that the massive JRPG has hit four million units sold globally since its US launch in September.

Long-time Dragon Quest creator and designer Yuji Horii thanked the fans in the announcement:

I was truly delighted when I heard the news that Dragon Quest XI had exceeded four million sales worldwide. Back when I created the first Dragon Quest game, over thirty years ago, I could not possibly have dreamed that it would become a series that would cross the seas and be played by people all around the world. This is the eleventh numbered Dragon Quest title, and in depicting a ‘hero’s tale,’ also represents a new beginning for the series.

When I think that there are now over four million of these heroes all around the world, and each one has gone on their own individual adventure, it reminds me how glad I am we made the game. I would like to express my sincere thanks to all the people who played Dragon Quest XI, both the fans of the previous games and the new fans who started with this one. Thank you all.

Although its the eleventh in the series, Dragon Quest 11 represents a fine starting point for newcomers. Like Final Fantasy, each entry is a self-contained adventure featuring recurring themes, concepts, and familiar RPG systems. It features turn-based battles, colorful monsters and allies, a huge world, and a classic hero’s journey of good versus evil.

Dragon Quest 11 is the first DQ game to reach the West since 2009’s Dragon Quest 9, and the first home console DQ game since 2004’s Dragon Quest 8.

Dragon Quest 11 is available on PlayStation 4 and PC (Steam). It’s rated T for Teen.