Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap

Several Remasters of Classic Games Are Out This Week

Posted by | News, PC, PlayStation 4, Switch, Xbox One | No Comments

As the first generation of gamers get older, remasters of classic games are only going to become more popular. This week sees no less than four remasters launching, including one collection that has six games.

Full Throttle Remastered is the latest Lucasarts adventure game to be given the remaster treatment. Like Day of the Tentacle and Grim Fandango, original designer Tim Schafer acquired the rights to his old game for his own indie studio Double Fine. Full Throttle was given the full HD treatment with improved graphics, sound, and controls, while preserving the original voice acting. You can also freely switch between the remastered and original version. It’s available for PC, PS4, and Xbox One.

The Disney Afternoon Collection isn’t so much remastered as it is several retro games packaged together with a few added perks. The collection includes six 8-bit titles: Chip ‘N Dale Rescue Rangers 1 and 2, Ducktales 1 and 2, Darkwing Duck, and TaleSpin. Each game retains its original graphics and gameplay.

New time attack and boss rush modes are available, as well as online leaderboards. You can also browse original assets, like game manuals, within the museum. A rewind feature and save states help alleviate the notorious difficulty of the otherwise excellent platforming games of the era. The Disney Afternoon Collection is available for PC, PS4, and Xbox One.

Voodoo Vince: Remastered is not a franchise I’m familiar with. But apparently it was popular enough to warrant a remaster. The 2003 Xbox platformer was not backwards compatible with the Xbox 360, making this the first chance many have to play it. The remaster updates to HD graphics while maintaining the same gameplay. It’s out for PC and Xbox One.

Finally Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap also released this week. It’s a remake of the old 1989 Wonder Boy III. This is by far the most extensive remaster, with brand new hand-drawn graphics and music. Numerous gameplay tweaks and features have been added, including the choice to play as a girl character. You can also switch between original and remake video and audio styles. It’s available now for PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch.  It’s scheduled to arrive for the PC this Summer.

SNES Classic Edition

SNES Classic Edition Reportedly Coming Later This Year

Posted by | News | No Comments

On the heels of the crushing news that Nintendo was discontinuing the popular NES Classic Edition, Eurogamer is reporting that an SNES version will arrive later this year. Eurogamer’s sources have revealed that the SNES mini-emulator is already in production, and should arrive in time for this holiday season. Eurogamer is one of gaming’s most credible sources, and almost always trustworthy when it comes to this kind of insider news.

Canceling one product to make room for another makes a bit more sense, even if Nintendo grossly underestimated the nostalgic appeal of the NES Classic Edition. The NES quickly sold out and despite some trickling new stock Nintendo was never able to meet the high demand. Instead of trying to make the NES a permanent SKU, it seems they have plans to simply move on to their next project.

Every loving thing said about the NES can be applied to the SNES ten times over. The NES may have saved gaming but the SNES solidified Nintendo has the premiere gaming company throughout the 90s.

The 16-bit console is home to many of the greatest games of all time, particularly the golden age of Japanese RPGs such as Chrono Trigger and Final Fantasy II and III (IV and VI). Beat ’em ups Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time and Sunset Riders were fantastic couch co-op games. Nintendo had a host of excellent first-part titles as well, from Super Mario World to Super Mario Kart and Super Metroid.

Hopefully Nintendo has learned its lesson from the NES Classic Edition. If you thought that retro console was in high demand, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

 

NES Classic Edition

NES Classic Edition Discontinued After Less Than Six Months

Posted by | News | No Comments

In less than stellar Nintendo news, the company has announced that they are officially discontinuing the NES Classic Edition.

The retro console launched last November. Since then it has been notoriously sold out and extremely difficult to find due to high demand. Additional units have been supplied sporadically in the following months, but no where near enough to meet demand, leading the console’s price to skyrocket from resellers.. But this week’s news of cancellation is a jarring shock to many who were still holding out hope.

Here is Nintendo of America’s official statement:

Throughout April, NOA territories will receive the last shipments of Nintendo Entertainment System: NES Classic Edition systems for this year. We encourage anyone interested in obtaining this system to check with retail outlets regarding availability. We understand that it has been difficult for many consumers to find a system, and for that we apologize. We have paid close attention to consumer feedback, and we greatly appreciate the incredible level of consumer interest and support for this product.

A Nintendo representative told IGN that the “NES Classic Edition wasn’t intended to be an ongoing, long-term product.” This is absolutely baffling given the obvious popularity of a nostalgic console at a prime price point ($60) packed with 30 games.

The NES Classic Edition was a tiny re-production of the original Nintendo Entertainment System that helped save gaming in the mid-80s. The NES is one of the most important consoles ever made, with an impressive library of classic games. The NES Classic Edition included all the best games, from Mario to Zelda and Metroid. Nintendo grossly miscalculated the number of nostalgic fans who wanted to relive the classics in a neat little package.

Nintendo claims they have listened to consumer feedback. An optimist may hope that this means we’ll see a new version of the retro console soon, as there’s clearly still a high demand for it. We can only hope that Nintendo, a company that’s well over a century old, learns a lot of lessons about market prediction and supply and demand.